What’s wrong ?

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
it dose look more like a crop problem more than a breathing problem, are you spoon feeding yet? weight looks good if not slightly over fed, the crop may need flushing
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
That chick should be out of a brooder by now its fully feathered so can keep itself warm I take it that the sound is the brooder still switched on? Temperature reduction required and out of the brooder.
@CaptainHowdy Amelia your thoughts would be much appreciated
@Parrot797 Mike would very much appreciate your input as well please.
Member is in Pakistan so that is also relevant
I'm thinking it looks like its very warm does it have access to water to drink from itself? Not seeing a bulging crop rather seems to be gaping periodically.... :thinking:
 

dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
I am very sorry to hear this. Did this chick die around the same age as the other one did, if so I would suggest you read up on the post from @DizzyBlue .
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Really sorry to read your post about th little chick @orangesplash that is very sad. Fly free little one over rainbow bridge.
Ok here comes your "official talking too" by somebody who has also reared loved and lost and also to having reared and been rewarded by chicks growing into adulthood and driving me batty ever since!
Yes it hurts when we get attached to our feathered friends and regardless of what we do or try we sometimes do loose them.
Remember this not all chicks in the wild that are parent reared survive either some parent birds know instinctively that there is a problem and chuck the chicks out the nest or indeed will kill them in the nest if there is an issue that they can sense.
As there is no definitive way to know without an avian post mortem to determine what the issue is what if it was a congenital issue that both chicks had? If it was then there is more than likely even a parent rearing them they would have passed on....
So mourn for your loss and shed some tears we all have at sometime or another. We never forget those that we have loved lost.
Then scrub everything down with some good avian disinfectant top to bottom absolutely everything brooder, dishes, trays, perches the flipping lot anything that those chicks came into contact with as a just in case measure. Throw any seed and hand rearing mix out and buy fresh ones in case it was something to do with the feed.
Do some reading up in the meantime about what temperature a chick should be kept at at what age, about consistency of food for different ages. Then go and find another breeder who's chicks are not related to those parent birds you got yours from hopefully purchase some older ones if you can perhaps look at a different species so as not to give yourself too much heart ache thinking they look the same as those that have passed.
Thing is good owners who dearly love their birds do get hurt and we do question ourselves and we then strive to be better and too make a difference.

Once again am sorry for your loss x
 

orangesplash

Regular Member
Registered
Really sorry to read your post about th little chick @orangesplash that is very sad. Fly free little one over rainbow bridge.
Ok here comes your "official talking too" by somebody who has also reared loved and lost and also to having reared and been rewarded by chicks growing into adulthood and driving me batty ever since!
Yes it hurts when we get attached to our feathered friends and regardless of what we do or try we sometimes do loose them.
Remember this not all chicks in the wild that are parent reared survive either some parent birds know instinctively that there is a problem and chuck the chicks out the nest or indeed will kill them in the nest if there is an issue that they can sense.
As there is no definitive way to know without an avian post mortem to determine what the issue is what if it was a congenital issue that both chicks had? If it was then there is more than likely even a parent rearing them they would have passed on....
So mourn for your loss and shed some tears we all have at sometime or another. We never forget those that we have loved lost.
Then scrub everything down with some good avian disinfectant top to bottom absolutely everything brooder, dishes, trays, perches the flipping lot anything that those chicks came into contact with as a just in case measure. Throw any seed and hand rearing mix out and buy fresh ones in case it was something to do with the feed.
Do some reading up in the meantime about what temperature a chick should be kept at at what age, about consistency of food for different ages. Then go and find another breeder who's chicks are not related to those parent birds you got yours from hopefully purchase some older ones if you can perhaps look at a different species so as not to give yourself too much heart ache thinking they look the same as those that have passed.
Thing is good owners who dearly love their birds do get hurt and we do question ourselves and we then strive to be better and too make a difference.

Once again am sorry for your loss x
You know what I have been so upset that I haven’t been able to come to terms with anything yet.
I was taken out for a drivey family got me fish which is my favourite but nothing is helping. I am missing him so much.
Did he aspirate? What happened ?
 

orangesplash

Regular Member
Registered
Really sorry to read your post about th little chick @orangesplash that is very sad. Fly free little one over rainbow bridge.
Ok here comes your "official talking too" by somebody who has also reared loved and lost and also to having reared and been rewarded by chicks growing into adulthood and driving me batty ever since!
Yes it hurts when we get attached to our feathered friends and regardless of what we do or try we sometimes do loose them.
Remember this not all chicks in the wild that are parent reared survive either some parent birds know instinctively that there is a problem and chuck the chicks out the nest or indeed will kill them in the nest if there is an issue that they can sense.
As there is no definitive way to know without an avian post mortem to determine what the issue is what if it was a congenital issue that both chicks had? If it was then there is more than likely even a parent rearing them they would have passed on....
So mourn for your loss and shed some tears we all have at sometime or another. We never forget those that we have loved lost.
Then scrub everything down with some good avian disinfectant top to bottom absolutely everything brooder, dishes, trays, perches the flipping lot anything that those chicks came into contact with as a just in case measure. Throw any seed and hand rearing mix out and buy fresh ones in case it was something to do with the feed.
Do some reading up in the meantime about what temperature a chick should be kept at at what age, about consistency of food for different ages. Then go and find another breeder who's chicks are not related to those parent birds you got yours from hopefully purchase some older ones if you can perhaps look at a different species so as not to give yourself too much heart ache thinking they look the same as those that have passed.
Thing is good owners who dearly love their birds do get hurt and we do question ourselves and we then strive to be better and too make a difference.

Once again am sorry for your loss x
Thank you DizzyBlue for replying in such detail.

you are right about the mourning bit but i am afraid to say that in my heart, there is still that urge of unshed tears and i feel i'm at the abyss of heartache right now.
My husband did agree to get me an African grey but i told this other breeder to give me the chick only when it is self feeding so i dont have to go through syringe feeding.

is that a good age?

please advise me.
i will post the video of the African grey so you all can see how it is fairing right now.

https://youtu.be/u0quHuHXkxM
 

Wendy Cooper-Wolfe

Regular Member
I have no experience whatsoever with feeding baby birds, but hopefully someone with knowledge will look at the video and be able to advise you.
 

Oli Fry

Regular Member
Registered
Yes that poor baby needs several more weeks of expert care - and it should be in a dark secure place, not under bright lights. Please don't buy a grey that is not fully weaned. I'm sorry to be blunt but your feelings don't really matter as much as the bird's welfare.
 

orangesplash

Regular Member
Registered
Yes that poor baby needs several more weeks of expert care - and it should be in a dark secure place, not under bright lights. Please don't buy a grey that is not fully weaned. I'm sorry to be blunt but your feelings don't really matter as much as the bird's welfare.
Thank you for the advise. You see when the postmortem was done, there was obvious infection.

they said there was mycoplasma. Now I don’t know whether To plan myself or the person who sold them to me
 

CaptainHowdy

Regular Member
Thank you for the advise. You see when the postmortem was done, there was obvious infection.

they said there was mycoplasma. Now I don’t know whether To plan myself or the person who sold them to me

Please ensure you thoroughly disinfect your house and clothes to ensure nothing gets passed onto your new little one when you bring them home. off the top of my head I can't recall how long mycoplasma can survive outside a host for.
 
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