Very Quiet And Skittish Yet Tame-ish Derbyan

JackAndRob

Regular Member
The only thing he did with his feathers at our home is preening. We saw him go nuts with his head on his anal region and then clean all his feathers which makes me believe he is using that oilgland they have there to just clean himself.
Our Eclectus Frankie was a feather plucker before he joined us. His wings were fine, but he had removed a lot of the top feathers from his body, leaving only the grey downy feathers, and his tail feathers are in poor condition yet he still manages to fly okay. We believe that he never had a bath/shower with his previous carers, so we give him a very fine misting every day - just a couple of squirts on each side of his body, under-side and top-side. He didn't like it at first, but it is very quick and he is used to it now. This encourages him to preen, his feather condition has improved as much as it can and he is no longer plucking. He is dropping a few feathers now, so we think that he might enter a moult soon. Aloe vera is often recommended for the moulting phase as it reduces irritation where the new feathers come through. Pure Aloe Vera Juice Organic was recommended from a UK supplier Fushi, but the same or similar product will be available in NL, and a pharmacy may be able to help if you struggle to find it.

You found Tommy in less than ideal conditions, but it does appear that he had quite a lot of human interaction at his previous home (Post #77), as he is adjusting very quickly - a week is no time at all. It all looks very good for the future.
 

Peter van Steenis

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Our Eclectus Frankie was a feather plucker before he joined us. His wings were fine, but he had removed a lot of the top feathers from his body, leaving only the grey downy feathers, and his tail feathers are in poor condition yet he still manages to fly okay. We believe that he never had a bath/shower with his previous carers, so we give him a very fine misting every day - just a couple of squirts on each side of his body, under-side and top-side. He didn't like it at first, but it is very quick and he is used to it now. This encourages him to preen, his feather condition has improved as much as it can and he is no longer plucking. He is dropping a few feathers now, so we think that he might enter a moult soon. Aloe vera is often recommended for the moulting phase as it reduces irritation where the new feathers come through. Pure Aloe Vera Juice Organic was recommended from a UK supplier Fushi, but the same or similar product will be available in NL, and a pharmacy may be able to help if you struggle to find it.

You found Tommy in less than ideal conditions, but it does appear that he had quite a lot of human interaction at his previous home (Post #77), as he is adjusting very quickly - a week is no time at all. It all looks very good for the future.
That sounds like a great idea. And you mix that aloe vera juice with the water of the misting bottle? We might have to get an even finer one as we use a fine plant misting one at the moment.

We are very hopeful and positive too about his progress and he just needs to feel included and loved again.
 

cazimodo

Regular Member
I use Fushi and one thing I found was that the pulpy bits got stuck in the pipe of the mister and blocked it, so I have to use a tea strainer to strain them out and just leave the juice. I spray with the aloe Vera mix every third spray so it doesn't build up on their feathers.

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Peter van Steenis

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I use Fushi and one thing I found was that the pulpy bits got stuck in the pipe of the mister and blocked it, so I have to use a tea strainer to strain them out and just leave the juice. I spray with the aloe Vera mix every third spray so it doesn't build up on their feathers.

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Ah so not mixing it but a seperate misting bottle with just the Fushi in it?
 

cazimodo

Regular Member
No. I mix it with water, but even then the bits can get stuck I mix it about one third aloe Vera juice to two thirds water generally. If Ziggy has had a particularly bad plucking session then I adjust the ratio a bit so there's more aloe Vera in the mix.

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Peter van Steenis

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No. I mix it with water, but even then the bits can get stuck I mix it about one third aloe Vera juice to two thirds water generally. If Ziggy has had a particularly bad plucking session then I adjust the ratio a bit so there's more aloe Vera in the mix.

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Ah then we will get a second misting bottle :) One for just water when he is not moulting and one for the aloe vera mix :)
I found that Fushi in NL too. If its the same but would be surprised if it isnt.
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
@cazimodo Thanks Caz' - I couldn't remember who recommended it :)

@Peter van Steenis That is the right one. Great :)

Tommy may enjoy a bath or shower at a later stage. Once he starts doing that, he will decide how much he needs and how often. For example, if you find that he likes a bath, you can offer it every day. If he reluctant to take a bath/shower, you may have to keep spraying him, but at least the spray is direct - you can spray straight on to his body, whereas a bath goes everywhere :rolleyes:

Jardine Jessie gets a shower offered every day. I just use the kitchen tap and play with the water with my hands which is a good way to monitor the temperature - slightly warm. Sometimes she ignores it, sometimes she has a quick dip and other times she gets herself really wet - she is in control.
 

cazimodo

Regular Member
Ziggy will tell you when she wants to be misted. If she hears the tap running in the kitchen and she's ready she starts yelling "C'mon! C'mon!" Frodo you could literally stand and spray all day. That boy loves his water. He often goes under the running tap and drinks from it too (cold of course). As soon as you turn the tap on he says "water!".

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Peter van Steenis

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Think that only looks like that haha. He is still very much uncomfy on her arm. He stands still but he doesn't look like he has a relaxed posture. Maybe we're wrong!

I came home from work and little bit after I trained the 3rd time of the day with him. He did very well and at one point he was sitting on my arm while i gave him a headscratch. He made a screech when i started but then got quiet. Only to hop away a bit after. He got some pretty good bites in my arm that are ending up blue and cut xD But what can you do, poor guy is defending himself. He is progressing very well at least and it just takes days of this training. He really seems to love his almonds so that helps.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
you can expect a few nips but this is the time when you do not want to reinforce biting, let him settle on your arm praise him and give the treat, if he goes to bite a simple NO and turn your head away for a few seconds then await for him to relax again then give the treat.
 

Peter van Steenis

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Yea apart from turning our heads away we are doing exactly that. He also just took a treat from my hand INSIDE his cage. We usually only give an almond when he does something good but he was such a good boy and he needs to gain some weight so some cheating now and then is to be excused haha. So proud of our boy :D
What we do with training is let him step up on the stick and when he does we put him back on the playstand, praise him and give him an almond(piece). And switch it up with hands/arm too. He will get there.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Parrots dislike being ignored, by turning your head away he cannot see the expression on your face, he gets no positive reaction, to be honest I find it hard not to smile if a bird try's to nip me so I have to turn my head away
 

Peter van Steenis

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Lol I wish it was like that for us..he doesn't nip. Its more a feeling of someone using a clipping tool on your skin :p

Good tip though, will definitly try it out!
 

Roz

Regular Member
Glad Tommy's vet visit went well. You will no doubt have found that you have had to go right back to the beginning with gaining his trust/training. That's ok.

Keep pairing yourself with good experiences for him (treats, head scratches, etc.) and you'll gain his trust.

Try not to do anything that results in a bite. I would shape the step up gradually. As soon as he steps up, give him the piece of almond and allow him to step down again (this way he is in control and realises that he has a choice - choice is an important reinforcer). Try this for a few times, then shape duration... the amount of time he is on your arm before you put him down again. He steps up. "Good boy!", and you wait one second before giving him the nut. Then let him step down again. Next time, 2 seconds etc. Watch his body language. Aim to keep it relaxed at all times. Don't push him so hard so that his body language changes from being relaxed. Pushing him too hard too fast will end in him becoming fearful and he may bite if he can't get away. Remember the more he bites, the more he is learning to bite.
 
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