Taking Birds Outside

Jazzy Bird

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Birds can pick up mites and other things outside, as I have a few free flyers and others that are harness trained it is something I have to be cautious of and I check my birds regally, I have not had any problems with any of the birds I take outside myself, although I am not one too think it cannot happen. now during my experience I have flown more than fifty birds and the only time I restricted there out side enjoyment was with the bird flue when that was around. my birds are used in displays and meet the public, I take them down town with me.
Oh wow, you’re quite the bird man Michael! I have never tried a harness. Gus would be the only one I’d try that with, but he can be grouchy. The other day I helped groom his pin feathers for the first time. Making progress with him!
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Training birds to fly on command too and from a to b and return on call can take quite a build up of the bond between both of you, there are a lot of dangers out side that you need to know and understand as well. most training starts from indoors a simple step up and step down, slowly given a larger gap for your bird to achieve, play hide and seek using more than one room and let the bird find you just by you calling them. but then you have the most worrying side they include getting your bird to fly from a height down to you (this has been the most common problem with birds new to free flying, recognizing predator's including cats dogs and other birds, knowing the weather and what way it can affect the bird and its attitude, roads and traffic, of course people can be a problem. this is just a few things, Harness training is the best way of getting your bird to enjoy the out side but I will only recommend the aviator harness, well worth the extra money and getting a long extension lead I will recommend. the harness comes with a training video but there are posts on this site to help as well
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
every part of training must be like a game for your bird and using its natural instincts and ways, you need to know what your bird will want at the time the training is successful it evan be any type of treat from shire excitement and praise to a cuddle or stroke or its favorite treat, you have to turn every thing into a game including introducing the harness and only go forwards to the next stage at your birds pace
 

Jazzy Bird

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Good info, thanks! Idk that I’ll tackle that kind of training anytime soon, but def helpful to know as much as possible. 😊
 

Jazzy Bird

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I take mine outside but they stay firmly in their cages we have lots of buzzards and other hawks here even the odd golden eagle, so better safe then sorry
Thanks for sharing! I agree - better safe than sorry. With the set up I had the other day, she was sitting on a travel cage about 3-4 feet off the ground, but she was under a 10x10 canopy. Either my husband or I were present and close. Would the large birds mentioned swoop down? Or would they actually land and walk up? Just wondering if the canopy is good protection bc to me, it seems perfect.
 

AMD

Regular Member
Thanks for sharing! I agree - better safe than sorry. With the set up I had the other day, she was sitting on a travel cage about 3-4 feet off the ground, but she was under a 10x10 canopy. Either my husband or I were present and close. Would the large birds mentioned swoop down? Or would they actually land and walk up? Just wondering if the canopy is good protection bc to me, it seems perfect.
Yes they would swoop down they have been known to take small cats and dogs and of course the odd lamb, the canopy would be a help at least you would get some warning of their arrival
 

Jazzy Bird

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Oh my! That’s quite an inventory!!! The white cage is the cage of the bird who died. I’ve decided to keep it and use for outdoor cage.
 

Jazzy Bird

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I see buster! 🥰 By the way, that was one of my dogs names 😊 You mentioned making things like a game - I’ve been thinking about that and wondering - how does one accomplish that?!? Like how do they know or tell if something is a game? Another thing I’ve wondered is how good are their memories. I wonder if they (especially Jasmine bc she gets around more to other areas of the house) remember things like the lay out of our house. I wonder if they saw my mom again, if they’d remember her. I play voicemails of hers that I have for them, and wonder if they still remember her voice. When I take jasmine outside I wonder if she catches on and knows, or eventually will know, what that means.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
A parrot memory is long, making a parrot game is to act excited enjoying what you are doing by involving your bird and getting him to react with interest. parrots are very nosey and will watch you with interest, they are curious and will investigate, it can take a little time for them to learn how to play, my birds have the freedom of my home and will go in every room they have there favorite places to go but visit every room but at night they all have there places they love to sleep either in there cage or there favorite room that they return too. its a good question about them remembering there past keepers, I am certain they do but do they understand its a recording, Some will get very excited others will become very quiet. I have keepers come to my home regally except this time of the virus. there bird still know them.
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
All of a bird's senses are more acute than ours. Couple that with a highly developed brain and memory will be excellent. In terms of good and bad experiences, they will remember as it will be essential for their survival in the wild. Where people are concerned, they will certainly remember those that they have had good and bad experiences with, greet old friends, sulk with those that they haven't taken a shine to.

In general terms, the more intelligent a creature is, the more likely it is to engage in playful activities - think about apes and dolphins. Parrots are very high on the animal IQ league.

The game question is really interesting. I guess that any activity that excites or interests them, and engages them physically and/or mentally could be considered a game, whether they do it on their own or with you e.g. wrecking a toy, dancing or singing, responding back and forth with you when you call them, etc.
 

AMD

Regular Member
A parrot memory is long, making a parrot game is to act excited enjoying what you are doing by involving your bird and getting him to react with interest. parrots are very nosey and will watch you with interest, they are curious and will investigate, it can take a little time for them to learn how to play, my birds have the freedom of my home and will go in every room they have there favorite places to go but visit every room but at night they all have there places they love to sleep either in there cage or there favorite room that they return too. its a good question about them remembering there past keepers, I am certain they do but do they understand its a recording, Some will get very excited others will become very quiet. I have keepers come to my home regally except this time of the virus. there bird still know them.
My Amazon is a grumpy old man except when my daughter in law visits I think she must remind him of his previous owner
 

Jazzy Bird

Regular Member
Registered
A parrot memory is long, making a parrot game is to act excited enjoying what you are doing by involving your bird and getting him to react with interest. parrots are very nosey and will watch you with interest, they are curious and will investigate, it can take a little time for them to learn how to play, my birds have the freedom of my home and will go in every room they have there favorite places to go but visit every room but at night they all have there places they love to sleep either in there cage or there favorite room that they return too. its a good question about them remembering there past keepers, I am certain they do but do they understand its a recording, Some will get very excited others will become very quiet. I have keepers come to my home regally except this time of the virus. there bird still know them.
I have noticed they are quite curious. I usually am upbeat and what not, when interacting. It sounds like trying to make it fun and light hearted is the way to go. That’s interesting how yours roam the house. Ours do not but we also have the room they’re in, gated off. They could climb the gate if they wanted. Jasmine sometimes comes down off her cage to get to my husband. Or, in the past she has came down when she saw brightly colored markers and high lighters - and snatched one up. It was funny! She likes to look around in the car. We used to play “toss” with these toys I bought her and then she started tossing them on her own, on top of the cage. I need to toss with her again, so she’ll be interested in them again. That’s awesome that your birds remember the keepers. I’ve learned a lot about them since having them - they’re fascinating!
 

Jazzy Bird

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My Amazon is a grumpy old man except when my daughter in law visits I think she must remind him of his previous owner
Awww. That’s interesting. Jasmine gets really excited when men come over. I’ve wondered if she likes men more bc her first owner was a male. Smart little creatures they are!
 

Jazzy Bird

Regular Member
Registered
All of a bird's senses are more acute than ours. Couple that with a highly developed brain and memory will be excellent. In terms of good and bad experiences, they will remember as it will be essential for their survival in the wild. Where people are concerned, they will certainly remember those that they have had good and bad experiences with, greet old friends, sulk with those that they haven't taken a shine to.

In general terms, the more intelligent a creature is, the more likely it is to engage in playful activities - think about apes and dolphins. Parrots are very high on the animal IQ league.

The game question is really interesting. I guess that any activity that excites or interests them, and engages them physically and/or mentally could be considered a game, whether they do it on their own or with you e.g. wrecking a toy, dancing or singing, responding back and forth with you when you call them, etc.
Thank you for all of the feedback! It’s interesting how they behave differently depending on their surroundings and the time of day. When I take jasmine for visits with my dad, she’s not nearly as vocal. She sits content etc and if I behave excited etc she’ll perk up. Right now she’s randomly talking, laughing and what not, without prompt. They have a large picture window and seem to enjoy watching what goes on outside. She laughs and whistles at one of our neighbors who walks by multiple times a day with her dog. She’s most vocal when she’s in her comfort zone. Both birds seem to enjoy watching me exercise as I have been working out in their room since the pandemic. Gus likes to listen to music and dance, so I do that with him. He can be grouchy and goes after me as if to bite me, if he doesn’t want to be touched. He also makes a noise that I interpret as him yelling at me and telling me to leave him alone. Lol. He did let me help groom his pin feathers for the first time the other day. He just doesn’t sit still for very long. Jasmine on the other hand does, and this makes it much easier to groom her.
 
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