Sunday 20th October

dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Good morning Michael and everyone, it is actually a dry sunny one here - but the grass is still too wet to mow.
Terry will enjoy his stay with you Michael.

Hope everyone has a nice Sunday.
By the way does anyone follow Strictly?
 

Kendra

Regular Member
Good morning everyone, and it actually is morning for a change.

Sorry no Dianna, do not watch Strickly.

Busy day today also Michael, picking up the multi coloured conure for my SIL, she is so excited but it is going to be long and hard work for her to tame but she really is looking forward to it, shame she does not have a computer, but refuses. I know if she has any problems she will ring me and I can harass you lot.

Bright and clear here but cold, brrrrr, hope everyone has a good day.
 

Ararajuba

Regular Member
Hi people, it's scorching hot here, well into the mid 30's, and we've just been out in it for a few hours, suffering the consequences. Despite setting off early, it was already 33° by around 9:30, and only continued heating up over the next few hours. The idea was to miss the heat by going early to the fair by the TV tower (this being a local tourist attraction for some reason, like a very poor man's Eiffel tower), where there are lots of handicrafts and local products sold, in case the nephew wanted to get some souvenirs or presents to take back. He's been here for over two weeks now and will be returning in a few days, so it might be his last chance to get anything beyond standard groceries and the like. He didn't seem very enthusiastic about traditional Brazilian handicrafts however, and mooched along vaguely behind us wondering aloud where the dodgy cheap smuggled Chinese electronics he had heard about were situated (somewhere else apparently, and the heat and his inability to speak Portuguese discouraged him from making any independent investigations, so he came back empty-handed).

We had a good look around at the fair (first time we have braved it there at the weekend when all the shops and stalls are open), and bought a few bits and pieces including a berimbau (a strange twangy musical instrument with one string which is hit with a stick), a bamboo recorder for our little girl to replace the two plastic ones she has broken recently, and a wooden parrot with wheels on a stick, which flaps its wings when pushed along the floor. She almost managed to trip several people up with the latter despite being repeatedly told to look where she was going with it, whereupon cruel heartless Daddy confiscated it till we got back, much to her disgust.

We stopped at the rather grimy eating area of the fair for some much needed refreshments and unwisely (especially in my case) decided to sample something adventurous, since there were several little cafes selling regional Brazilian cuisine, including some stuff that's rarely found here. I thought we were just going to get snacks, but we ended up being served a large dinner each. We unwisely selected a place which apparently served traditional Amazonian food, and I even more unwisely ordered something indecipherable which came in a very rough and thick medieval-looking earthenware pot, containing what I can only describe as half of an unfortunate duck which had evidently been brutally hacked into randomly sized and shaped chunks with a machete, then boiled to impenetrable toughness with a large quantity of unidentifiable Amazonian herbs which resembled mutant watercress, in an ominous yellowish liquid flavoured with possibly botanical, possibly mineral, possibly animal substances that I have never tasted before, and probably ought never to seek out again if I value my life and health. Whatever it was made my mouth numb after the first spoonful, as though it had been anaesthetized, and after that I wasn't entirely sure what any of it tasted like, which may have been just as well. Subsequent research suggests that the liquid almost certainly contained bitter cassava juice (which contains toxic quantities of cyanide before being boiled for a few days, which will hopefully break it down into something less toxic), but the FIL thinks the mutant watercress, which is indeed some strange Amazonian herb, was more likely to have been the culprit.

Somehow I was supposed to eat the tough duck with a particularly flimsy plastic spoon which looked as though it would disintegrate into multiple shards before the meat was even dented, so I gave up, fished it out, and ate it the caveman way, with some difficulty. After I finished I noticed, rather enviously, that they had given the wife actual cutlery for her large unidentifiable fish, which had been fried in some kind of heavily salted, vaguely herbal batter that made you begin craving water after one or two bites - just what was needed in weather like this! The nephew was less adventurous than we, and looked rather smug with his plate of boringly ordinary crab with rice (it will probably turn out to be some kind of carnivorous arboreal man-eating crab, mind you).
 
Last edited:

dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
@Ararajuba Oh my goodness what a meal, you really made me laugh out loud at your description of it especially the cynaide part!!
So nephew is there then, hopehe's not being hounded by the MIL - or anyone else come to that.

Off to have good old roast beef & yorkshire puds now, its just about read.
 

Ararajuba

Regular Member
@diana T - I thought that this would be safe, as I knew it wasn't the other Amazonian food I already knew about which contained cyanide (in the form originally highly toxic cassava leaf which is boiled over days into a green mush); but it turned out that this did as well - possibly in smaller quantities, or possibly not! It seems that a little cyanide is pretty much regarded as a tasty condiment up there!
 

Wendy Cooper-Wolfe

Regular Member
@Ararajuba - at first I thought you were going to end the story with a funny tummy but it seems you have survived that! Amazing what constitutes a gourmet dinner in different countries.
 

Kendra

Regular Member
@Michael Reynolds There was a photo online of him but as soon as I said we would take him he vanished off. Her is now at Lyn's so will have to pester husband for one. They said as soon as he was put into his new large cage he started chattering and whistling, bobbing his head and eating, a totally different bird. Lyn is absolutely thrilled although he is a lot smaller than I thought he would be, smaller that a budgie but more of the sleek cockatiel shape.
 
Top Bottom