My New Addition

JessCheekyMia

Regular Member
She came from a loving home but her owners are so busy with work and had no time for her. They did the best thing for her. She can't be handled yet! She is fiesty and has a lot of attitude which I love lol.

Now I need to find a better cage for her.
 

TomsMum

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Thought so .....good one though :risas3:

It would be a lovely thought, but quite hard work to integrate a young feisty blue and gold into your current flock, I had visions of an exhausted Roy asleep with his head on the kitchen worktop!
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
My brains have gone dead was trying to think of the species of wild parrot that eats coco so I thought I will look it up. no luck yet any ideas
 

dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
I totally agree @TomsMum

But Michael, something rings a bell with what you said I think it was on a TV prog didn't they eat the cocoa pods and then went to a clay lick? as if they knew it may be an antidote. But I too cannot find details.

In any case it's definitely a no no for our parrots.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
The coco seed or nut is toxic to most bird species and of course most parrots but one species in the wild has developed an immunity to the toxins now I know of some birds and finches to use the fibber's for nesting but it was a question that I was asked and my mind went blank although I have read about it in my studies. its surprises me some of the information that I come across looking the subject up that even today I have learnt of as there are two birds known as Barraband's one is the birds I have that comes from Australia and called the superb parrot the other that I never realised was called Barrabands are from south America and known as Splendour Parrots. (the Orange cheek parrot) I learn something new every day.
 

TomsMum

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Yes, wild parrots are known to eat local things and know which “antidotes” to go to. It is known for certain wild amazons to eat certain forms of avocado with no ill effects, but as we know cultivated avocado is a complete no no for parrot species. It’s a bit like the apple pips issue, how much is too much. That’s why we have an avoid list so that no-one ends up taking a chance that might be regretful.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
I was doing a lecture on parrots this morning in an old peoples community home. and I asked them to think of a question about parrots and ask me at the end of my demonstration and lecture. this was the only question I could not answer and it is bugging me. they enjoyed the talk and some of the questions I was asked was what bird is best for knowing most words? this was a budgie that passed away in 1994 in California USA and had a record 1728 words it new. Can birds take salt with there food and I explained the problem that salt cannot be extracted through sweating like in humans but there is a parakeet that has found away that allows it to eat salted grasses as it lives near the coasts in Australia. two of the residence have my budgies as company birds and being Easter the main subject was about eggs and birds. Now my Question was very carefully put over and in no way was it telling new members that its ok to give chocolate to there birds. Now this site we encourage people to ask questions as no question is a stupid question apart from one and that is "What is stupid".
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Its interesting you said about Avocado if you freeze frame the film Paulie at the point when he is reading the book Parrots the world of you will see it recommends Avocado as one of the food to feed but this we now understand as a big No No. the parrot that eats the coco has never been spotted eating clay but it is only assumed that it is eating something that can reverse the affects of the toxins. Studies of these birds was still going on and I will love to see updates on how the studies in the wild are progressing. well its a bit difficult when I cannot remember the species name:BangHead::BangHead::BangHead:
 

TomsMum

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
In the Caribbean it is noted that woodpeckers and woodcreepers break up cacao pods, but they are after insects, not actually eating the pods or seeds.
 
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