Microchipping

Natasha

Regular Member
hey guys.
My baby birdie is closed rung. But I was wondering would it be a good idea to also get her microchipped? I'm wanting to engage in free flying with her so just incase she flies off or something?
Tia x
 

JackAndRob

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Microchipping gives you are far better chance of being reunited with your bird if you become separated. Vets, rescues, the RSPCA, etc routinely scan for 'chips when a bird comes in and they can quickly identify a keeper from the registered details. Leg rings are hit and miss by comparison. Ultimately, they depend on the keeper calling them and knowing what the ring number is.

The chip is like a grain of rice, but the needle, relative to the body size, is large and it has to be inserted deep into the chest/flight muscle to ensure that the chip does not move once implanted. The skin is normally closed using medical grade cynoacrylate (superglue). The procedure takes less than 5 mins.

Jardine Jessie is 'chipped. At 250g, the risks of the procedure were relatively small. I put it off for too long but she handled it just fine. I did limit Jessie's activity for 24 hours - a bird's chest muscles are used for breathing so it was likely to be sore for a while. Anything on top of that (e.g. flight) is worth restricting to help the healing process, but within 24 hours it was as if nothing had happened and Jessie suffered no ill effects.

Many vets will implant microchips because in the long run, it makes the process of locating the keeper a quicker, more efficient and less costly process. For this reason, the procedure is normally inexpensive. Talk to your avian vet about it and they will advise about the risks and suitability.
 

Natasha

Regular Member
Microchipping gives you are far better chance of being reunited with your bird if you become separated. Vets, rescues, the RSPCA, etc routinely scan for 'chips when a bird comes in and they can quickly identify a keeper from the registered details. Leg rings are hit and miss by comparison. Ultimately, they depend on the keeper calling them and knowing what the ring number is.

The chip is like a grain of rice, but the needle, relative to the body size, is large and it has to be inserted deep into the chest/flight muscle to ensure that the chip does not move once implanted. The skin is normally closed using medical grade cynoacrylate (superglue). The procedure takes less than 5 mins.

Jardine Jessie is 'chipped. At 250g, the risks of the procedure were relatively small. I put it off for too long but she handled it just fine. I did limit Jessie's activity for 24 hours - a bird's chest muscles are used for breathing so it was likely to be sore for a while. Anything on top of that (e.g. flight) is worth restricting to help the healing process, but within 24 hours it was as if nothing had happened and Jessie suffered no ill effects.

Many vets will implant microchips because in the long run, it makes the process of locating the keeper a quicker, more efficient and less costly process. For this reason, the procedure is normally inexpensive. Talk to your avian vet about it and they will advise about the risks and suitability.
Thank you so much! This was really informative x
 
Hi, both of our macaws were chipped before we got them, and they both had closed rings on their legs. Bebe's ring is blank, so we think it may just have been to identify her as female early on. Gary's did have breeder info on it, but he's got a gob like a vice and he crushed it onto his leg when he was still an inquisitive baby :nut:. We got the vet to cut it off.
 

JackAndRob

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Eclectus Frankie didn't have a ring, so we got him chipped quite quickly. I'd considered getting Jardine Jessie's ring removed shortly after we got her as it appeared to be causing some irritation. Under advice by the vet, it was monitored closely but soon settled down. Jessie still has the ring as well as the 'chip.

Is this for your BFA? Over 400g in that case, so there will be plenty of muscle for the vet to implant the 'chip.

Of course there's another side to this too. If your bird is stolen, or found and not reported, the first time that it is scanned, there will be a better chance of identifying the rightful keeper.
 

Natasha

Regular Member
Eclectus Frankie didn't have a ring, so we got him chipped quite quickly. I'd considered getting Jardine Jessie's ring removed shortly after we got her as it appeared to be causing some irritation. Under advice by the vet, it was monitored closely but soon settled down. Jessie still has the ring as well as the 'chip.

Is this for your BFA? Over 400g in that case, so there will be plenty of muscle for the vet to implant the 'chip.

Of course there's another side to this too. If your bird is stolen, or found and not reported, the first time that it is scanned, there will be a better chance of identifying the rightful keeper.
It will be for her when I get her yeah :) do you have a rough idea of the cost?
 

JackAndRob

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
There will be the cost for the implantation. As I said before, this is not normally expensive as they want to encourage us to do it. Probably £20-30. You then have to register the chip on the IdentiBase website and there are a few price points for that with various benefits for each level. I think that the maximum is £21/22 - it is a one-off payment, no repeat fees.
 
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