Indian ringneck

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
@chlo welcome to the parrot club, I thought it will be better to post you question here as it is better for me to help you and other members can give there advice, How long have you had Him/her? do you know how old He/she is? what is your birds name? can you post a photo? so you want help in training these wonderful birds.
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
@chlo welcome to the parrot club, I thought it will be better to post you question here as it is better for me to help you and other members can give there advice, How long have you had Him/her? do you know how old He/she is? what is your birds name? can you post a photo? so you want help in training these wonderful birds.
Thank you @Michael Reynolds! I’ve had Kiwi for nearly 2 months, I was told he was 10 months old when I got him from a “professional” breeder. Turned out to be a guy keeping loads of birds in a tiny shed. Kiwi was in a tiny cage with 7 other scared IRNs for who knows how long, the only time they saw a human was when the guy put his arm in to chase one around and take it out to sell. Because of this I can completely understand his fear of people. I sit opposite the cage everyday talking to him, his cage door is never shut so he comes out whenever he likes. He makes two different chirps when I play IRN videos to him, but aside from that he is very quiet. He doesn’t tolerate other people as much - as soon as someone else comes into my room he hides somewhere or goes behind the cage. I’ve tried feeding him lots of different fruits and vegetables but he doesn’t seem to bother with them at all. I just want him to be less scared of me and realise that he’s safe here. Even changing his water and food when he’s inside the cage makes him flap about sometimes :crybaby2:
 

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Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
I am quite busy today as I have to sort my flock out ready as I am in hospital tomorrow, so I will spend more time during the week to advise you, Kiwi if a male should develop a black and pink ring around his neck soon if not I think you may have a female,
 

Wakizashi21

Regular Member
Thank you @Michael Reynolds! I’ve had Kiwi for nearly 2 months, I was told he was 10 months old when I got him from a “professional” breeder. Turned out to be a guy keeping loads of birds in a tiny shed. Kiwi was in a tiny cage with 7 other scared IRNs for who knows how long, the only time they saw a human was when the guy put his arm in to chase one around and take it out to sell. Because of this I can completely understand his fear of people. I sit opposite the cage everyday talking to him, his cage door is never shut so he comes out whenever he likes. He makes two different chirps when I play IRN videos to him, but aside from that he is very quiet. He doesn’t tolerate other people as much - as soon as someone else comes into my room he hides somewhere or goes behind the cage. I’ve tried feeding him lots of different fruits and vegetables but he doesn’t seem to bother with them at all. I just want him to be less scared of me and realise that he’s safe here. Even changing his water and food when he’s inside the cage makes him flap about sometimes :crybaby2:
Hi Chloe, when i was younger i made the same mistake where i thought i was getting a bargain from a professional breeder. Unfortunately some people are doing it for the profit only, so the birds wellbeing is never considered.

My advice and opinion:

1. Its going to take some time to get the bond again with the ringneck. I would start again from the beginning. I used to read my books infront of the ringnecks to show then i was never a threat to them.

2. No sudden movements. Try and eliminate it as much as possible to not freak the bird out.

3. Build a routine, from feeding to cleaning. I used to feed the birdies at 6am and 6pm, clean cage at 7 and bedtime for 8pm.

4. Try and keep the bird cage protected from two sides (usually corner of the room) but near enough for ringneck to see you.

5. Towelling to get the bird back into the cage is really a no no, unless its a must. I always thought that was a bond breaker and always caused issues for me.

6. One of our members Roz has a brilliant post about training worthwhile checking out.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
I am quite busy today as I have to sort my flock out ready as I am in hospital tomorrow, so I will spend more time during the week to advise you, Kiwi if a male should develop a black and pink ring around his neck soon if not I think you may have a female,
I hope all is okay! Yes I’ve spent hours reading about the breed so I am just waiting for this little ring to come through to determine what the little fella is (the guy looked like he guessed the gender) haha
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
Hi Chloe, when i was younger i made the same mistake where i thought i was getting a bargain from a professional breeder. Unfortunately some people are doing it for the profit only, so the birds wellbeing is never considered.

My advice and opinion:

1. Its going to take some time to get the bond again with the ringneck. I would start again from the beginning. I used to read my books infront of the ringnecks to show then i was never a threat to them.

2. No sudden movements. Try and eliminate it as much as possible to not freak the bird out.

3. Build a routine, from feeding to cleaning. I used to feed the birdies at 6am and 6pm, clean cage at 7 and bedtime for 8pm.

4. Try and keep the bird cage protected from two sides (usually corner of the room) but near enough for ringneck to see you.

5. Towelling to get the bird back into the cage is really a no no, unless its a must. I always thought that was a bond breaker and always caused issues for me.

6. One of our members Roz has a brilliant post about training worthwhile checking out.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Unfortunately as this is my first bird I didn’t really read too much into this breeder, just saw the photos of him handling healthy looking birds. Wish I’d done more research beforehand!

Definitely need to set up some sort of routine with feeding as I just always leave food in the cage for when I go to work (sometimes I work midday - 11pm so I always leave him some in case he’s hungry).

I’ve never ever towelled him, I’ve always been too scared to hurt the lil guy! I’ve been quite lucky that he automatically goes back into his cage when the room starts getting dark at night. He loves coming out of his cage and comes straight out if he’s been shut in for whatever reason. Found out he loves almonds and dried banana so I’m trying to feed him less so I can use them as treats. Currently won’t go near my hand if it’s in the cage so I’ve been wedging the treats between the cage bars hoping he’ll take them eventually!
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Hi the opp went well, there is some good advice given, the older the bird the longer it will take to gain its trust but you do have a few advantages. the Ringneck will adapt to what situation it finds itself in, no matter how untamed it is providing you are the provider and not do things that will frighten it, they do need flying time and also a place they fill safe in, once he/she has stopped being flighty every time you approach then this is when you can start training, whist the bird is out place a grape or a peace of apple near the cage, when he has taken it twice with out you moving then place it further away from your cage and slowly closer to you, please keep me updated on the progress so I can help guide you. has your bird got a ring on its leg? there are some people capturing feral birds and selling them and owing to the colouring I can not rule out if your bird has been captured or has been bred by the seller. I have trained wild, feral, aviary, parent reared and had hand reared, they are all trainable providing there experience with humans as not been bad to cause injury. the aim is to want your bird to be part of your flock and gain trust in you.
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
Hi the opp went well, there is some good advice given, the older the bird the longer it will take to gain its trust but you do have a few advantages. the Ringneck will adapt to what situation it finds itself in, no matter how untamed it is providing you are the provider and not do things that will frighten it, they do need flying time and also a place they fill safe in, once he/she has stopped being flighty every time you approach then this is when you can start training, whist the bird is out place a grape or a peace of apple near the cage, when he has taken it twice with out you moving then place it further away from your cage and slowly closer to you, please keep me updated on the progress so I can help guide you. has your bird got a ring on its leg? there are some people capturing feral birds and selling them and owing to the colouring I can not rule out if your bird has been captured or has been bred by the seller. I have trained wild, feral, aviary, parent reared and had hand reared, they are all trainable providing there experience with humans as not been bad to cause injury. the aim is to want your bird to be part of your flock and gain trust in you.
I’m glad! :aplastao:

He has no ring on his leg at all. The dude who sold him to me clipped his wings (with child scissors, may I add!!!), but he is still able to fly fairly well... I’ve recently purchased a small java tree with toys and a food bowl on it so he has a little play area away from his cage but he doesn’t seem to be interested in it just yet.

Going near the cage to change water, clean up etc while he is in/on/near the cage makes him start scrambling to the furthest point away from me. If he’s sat on top of the cage and I go near him, he flies to the other side of the room to put some distance between us. He will only go back if I’m away from the cage or out of the room.

I’ve realised that because he is constantly on edge watching me, he isn’t very interested in food. He will only start to eat if I’ve been sat in the room for an hour or sometimes more.

Also if I’m at work, I’m told he chirps very loudly throughout the day so I was wondering if that was some sort of relaxation chirp or a lonely one?? He makes the same noise if I play him IRN videos so I’m not sure what it means.

I’ve tried holding a perch next to him when he’s in and out of his cage but he really wants nothing to do with that either. Just testing to see if it was hands he was afraid of but it seems to be both right now!
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
ok the positive side of a ringneck calling is that they do not like being on there own, all ringnecks will call as they fly, you should always approach these birds by making sounds talking or even a whistle, I will treat yours as a feral bird for now, I have often fed the feral ringnecks around London so even in the wild they can gain a lot of trust in humans. going back about three or four years and look at some of the posts I made about Beryl a wild bird that became my families best friend. look at last November's post that Dizzyblue started "National Geographic" can I ask what area you live? don't have to be precise but it may help me think of what likely hood your bird is feral. I know many of the slight colour variation's and have a daughter in law whom studded feral ringneck;s at Cambridge university with bird from both in England and Europe.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
ok when dose the ring develop, this is a common question that I have been asked by owners, if originated from the Africa's it can be as long as three and a half years, if it from the Asian areas normally two and a half years, now depending on the length of the generations bread in captivity the time of some colour variations can develop the ring in just over a year. most of the green coloured that have been captive bred for many years will develop the ring in one and a half to two years, feral birds however may take a little longer depending on there original date of its family being in captivity that shortens the length and the time the original birds was released that they are slowly developing the ring later in there life, why is there such a difference in the wild birds from Africa and the wild birds from India's, this is thought to be that the African birds have less good contact with humans as many get captured and brought up in Indian families and some escape. they are found in great numbers in places that have lots of humans and human contact , they tend to rely on food and waste from us so are in general far better feed
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
ok the positive side of a ringneck calling is that they do not like being on there own, all ringnecks will call as they fly, you should always approach these birds by making sounds talking or even a whistle, I will treat yours as a feral bird for now, I have often fed the feral ringnecks around London so even in the wild they can gain a lot of trust in humans. going back about three or four years and look at some of the posts I made about Beryl a wild bird that became my families best friend. look at last November's post that Dizzyblue started "National Geographic" can I ask what area you live? don't have to be precise but it may help me think of what likely hood your bird is feral. I know many of the slight colour variation's and have a daughter in law whom studded feral ringneck;s at Cambridge university with bird from both in England and Europe.
I live in Reading, got Kiwi from Hayes, Middlesex though! You’ve now got me thinking that he caught birds and is now selling them off!!! Would explain how skittish he is and the distance I have to be for him to feel comfortable...

Whenever he flies around my room, he never makes a sound though! He’s never made a sound to say he’s scared or as a warning; only ever responding to the sounds I play to him of other birds. He’s actually very quiet! (The same definitely can’t be said about my green cheeked conure :nono:)
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
ok that may be because of his/her age, that he dose not sound when he flies also females as less noisy than males if they fly. the bids that are feral around Middlesex do have the wings a darker shade of green, the tail feathers on mature birds can have two black or darker feather in them and the rest yellow if it is from a closer area to central London the male have there wing two primary feathers being dark and nearly black when mature. the DNA shows the heritage as being from India originally. My daughter in law wrote the papers just over four years ago so colure variants may of changed over the years as flocks are moving north and even in parts of Scotland, at the time only birds found along the south east cost had African decedent DNA and have flown through the south of Europe from the Africa's, shading is completely different as they tend to be same wing colour than its body. oh dear I was told to get as much sleep as i can and there is me going through a copy of my step daughters paper and findings. Ha Ha well I did get some sleep with out interruption whilst down under opps! yes my green cheek loves calling and letting me know he is coming
 
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chlo

Regular Member
Registered
Oh I will have to look a bit closer at him then, he was very scruffy when I got him but he seems a bit more tidy now! I will get back to you on his colouration.

Damn! Get some sleep!!! I appreciate you looking through them though, thank you for the new info :) Kiwi just stood on an unsteady perch so he had to do an emergency landing - the landing location being my leg... realised where he was and flew right off haha!!!
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
that's great I bet you was supprised, yes I got one hours sleep before Poppy came in and started playing with my ear the problem is I suffer with insomnia if I get two and a half hours sleep I in a night I have done well, what is your excuse for being up at the times you posted Ha Ha
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
I was haha! And awww so cute but I imagine very annoying after a while :p oh damn! That must really suck :rolleyes: I finished work at 12 so I was eating my dinner at that time haha!!
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
@Michael Reynolds update on Kiwi. Introduced him to my conure today for the first time (we got Echo the green cheek 2 days ago and he takes food from you through the bars of his cage but is fully flighted so doesn’t care for any training you have to offer). So turns out Kiwi is a big wuss! Went onto Echo’s cage because it’s an open top, was chased off by the little man himself! Thought him being a bigger bird would make him the bully if they weren’t friends but it appears to be the other way around haha. They were fine sat opposite and even near each other, but if they were within lunging distance that’s when we would see open beak warnings.

HOWEVER. Some idiot in my family let the dog into the house (I put him outside when I let any birds out) and I JUST managed to save kiwi from dying via heavy bulldog cuddles... the dog would never hurt him purposely, but would get excited and forget his own strength with a little animal if he ever got near one. But I had to TOWEL him... I would never have done it in any other situation, but I knew it was the only way to help him. Because of this, I’m no longer going to allow kiwi or echo free flight around the house if other people are around to stop this from happening again.

Just super scared he’s going to hate me from now on :(
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
ok what I say to families with younger members is make signs up saying birds are out, fit them to your door or doors while you get the birds out and instruct any person that they do not open doors or windows with out you saying it ok.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Conures can be fearless mine along with the parolett rule the bird room George tried to rule the living room as well but then he was meeting the bigger birds of my flock Ha Ha, he soon discovered he had no chance.
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
ok what I say to families with younger members is make signs up saying birds are out, fit them to your door or doors while you get the birds out and instruct any person that they do not open doors or windows with out you saying it ok.
That’s definitely a good idea, I’m going to do that tomorrow after work for sure. Do you think Kiwi will take more time now to trust me after having to forcefully pick him up?? Obviously I was doing it because I had no other choice, his safety to me comes before his trust!
 

chlo

Regular Member
Registered
Conures can be fearless mine along with the parolett rule the bird room George tried to rule the living room as well but then he was meeting the bigger birds of my flock Ha Ha, he soon discovered he had no chance.
Haha!! Fierce little buggers!!!
 
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