Important Info For All African Grey Parrot Keepers - Re Cites 1

TomsMum

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DizzyBlue has contacted Defra by phone this morning to try to clarify some details regarding the change in classification of African Grey Parrots to Appendix 1 of CITES - the following is provided to help you, and will be amended / updated as soon as any other information becomes available from Defra.
Defra is the UK government department which is responsible for CITES licensing, overseas members will need to refer to the licensing body in their Country.

The CITES classification will apply to:
Psittacus Erithacus - Congo Grey Parrot
Psittacus Timneh - Timneh Grey Parrot
And any sub-species that may be defined.

The new clasification will come into effect in 2017 - Defra will announce an applicable from date via their website, and we will publish that here once known.

After that date no bird can be used commercially - e.g for photography, shows, display, etc; or sold without the Article 10 Certificate identifying that particular bird.

Breeding birds :
will require a Breeding Licence - cost £221
For each specific breeding pair - the first chick bred needs to be registered on an Article 10 certificate - cost £31.50, and subsequent chicks - cost £1.50 each
If there is a second breeding in the year by the same pair then all those chicks - cost £1.50 each

Companion birds:
Do not necessarily need to be registered - but there are some points you may wish to consider.
To register on an Article 10 Certificate - cost £31.50 you will need a separate Article 10 for each bird.
If you have birds that are from the same parents and the birds hatched in the same breeding season - the first bird will be £31.50, subsequent birds at £1.50.

Foster carers cannot register a bird under their care, they will have to refer to the owner, for the owner to do so - and owners need to check with their insurers.

If you do not register, then gifting paperwork would be required to enable you to pass the bird to a new home, and no monies are allowed to be transacted as part of that Rehoming process.

Insurance Companies may have a view on a bird's 'value' if it is not registered - this will become clearer in due course - and may be a consideration for you.

The forum will provide support for members in getting the relevant forms and filling them out.
As this isn't an immediate change, you have some time to think about how you want to proceed particularly in relation to companion birds.
 
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sunnyring

Regular Member
does anyone know what the score is if a companion bird becomes a breeding bird? can the paperwork be upgraded to reflect status or would a breeder have to register a chick as a breeding bird in hope one day it will be suitable?
 

DizzyBlue

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As long as both birds are registered would presume the chick could be too but as long as you don't intend to sell the chick you can either keep it or gift it then it's neither here nor there I think ....

@Parrot797 - Mike what's your opinion please?

By the way very very grateful for you bringing everything to our attention so we can prepare its very much appreciated. :thumbsup:
 

Parrot797

Regular Member
It is my opinion and indeed experience that the registration of each adult bird is £31.50p per bird not the £221!
The pair of birds can then breed but all the young must be registered at £31.50 for the first and then £1.50p for the others from the same year.
CITES papers may require the owner to send the papers back to DEFRA when the bird is sold,but it also may require the seller to give the papers to the buyer so you must read what is on the CITES papers.
On over 10% of papers I have been given there has been a mistake done by DEFRA so check these well before sale as you would be liable!
 

DizzyBlue

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The £221 is for breeders to get everything listed and be licensed not for "Joe Bloggs" like us - my crap explanation to Jude earlier :( sorry

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/355264/cites-ag-ct-01.pdf

"f. Registration as a CITES registered breeder: £221.00 Where a request is received to become a CITES registered breeder, all the Appendix I specimens held by the captive-breeding operation to which that registration is to relate may be included together in one application."
 

Bradders

Parrot Power!
Staff member
Moderator
Thanks for this.

I have a question. If you didn't get your grey registered and then your bird got lost or was stolen, would that have implications or is that a stupid question!?
 

TomsMum

Administrator
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Admin
It's not a stupid question... No question ever is...we're here to help one another out!

It's not a stupid question because there is a view that whether or not your bird is 'registered' may affect your cover....this is still theory and we will await to see what insurers do... The thought is that if the bird not registered...does not have a 'value' and therefore would not have a monetary cover value to be paid out in the event of loss or theft.

Please...no adverse comments on the theory.....I'm just repeating things that have been said to us....
So...we await to see what the insurers say, do, or what exclusions they may seek to apply ...and we won't know that for a little while.
 
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jaspers mum

Regular Member
To be registered would this be a one off payment, per bird?
I fear insurance companies will be rubbing their hands over this :(
 

jaspers mum

Regular Member
Im worried theyll try and take our birds away, like bsl are with the 'typed' dogs. Exempted dogs have to have a certificate from defra, i fear theyre going the same route with birds :(
 

TomsMum

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Im worried theyll try and take our birds away, like bsl are with the 'typed' dogs. Exempted dogs have to have a certificate from defra, i fear theyre going the same route with birds :(
Awww don't be worried, it's not being done as a penalty against folks keeping companion birds..... CITES is all about trying to stop international trading in endangered species ( it isn't always as successful as it's goals might wish it to be, but it does help!)

There's some info on the World Parrot Trust website about why the listing is important for the wild grey parrot
https://www.parrots.org/
 

Shirley

Regular Member
Jude i best ring my insurance company as Scooby is coverd for lost , stolen and death i am worried sick also they don't pay the vet bills also because he isn't cities 1 or am i over reacting im in a right confused. Com mess lol .

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 

dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
As I understand it pet Greys do not have to be registered with the Cites paperwork if they are not to be sold.
If you want to sell your bird it will have to be registered. If its given as a gift then registration is not needed. Anyone who breeds a grey parrot will need to register both the parents and all of the chicks even if only one is sold. A breeder in this context includes private as well as professional breeders. All of this is no different to restrictions that already apply to all other CITES 1 Annex A parrots.
This has been agreed by the CITES Conference of Parties (COP) and still has to be incorporated into European Law this process can take many months.

I hope this helps.
 
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K8

Regular Member
I believe it's not in force until next year @Shirley so plenty of time to find out exactly how it will affect things.
Can't see how it will affect the private pet owners or it shouldn't anyway.
 
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