Im A Rescue Bird

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
I agree that a bird no matter what age and background can have issues that we need to understand but I have taken on many birds and nearly all have come from loving and very caring homes. the term Rescue I will say is not the term I like as it implies the bird was in great trouble. I have only rescued two birds one that if it was not for my intervention and the negotiation to buy the bird I doubt if it would of lived that long in the home it had. that was Lucky my blue crowned conure, the other was Beryl a wild ringneck that I paid a young boy twelve pounds for as it was in such a bad state (after what is believed being attacked by a fox) and turned out to be so special I still get tears as I type about him but there is no way he would of lived if it was not for me and my vet. Now I agree rehoming or providing a home or even a refuge are better terms to use in most cases, I also say providing a better home than what was available is not being rescued but it is improving the birds chances in leading a better life (especially with the disabled birds I take on) We all can rescue birds just by being on this site and educating there keepers on what they should or should not do and helping them keep there birds happier and healthy and live longer.
 

darrendiver

Regular Member
whilst i agree with a lot you have said , i do think a lot of birds need to be rescued from stubborn minded people who keep them in a small cage all day and miss treat or neglect these wonderful creatures , they are highly intelligent animals and being so bored that their only entertainment is to pluck out their own feathers for me screams out , i need to be rescued
 

dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
I agree with both of you, so much still needs to be done in educating people but sadly there are many who think they know best and do not and will not listen....after all....'they are only birds' !
 

marley

Regular Member
whilst i agree with a lot you have said , i do think a lot of birds need to be rescued from stubborn minded people who keep them in a small cage all day and miss treat or neglect these wonderful creatures , they are highly intelligent animals and being so bored that their only entertainment is to pluck out their own feathers for me screams out , i need to be rescued
Sadly I have seen nearly as many birds in rescues that need rescuing as with individual owners
 

RoyJess

Regular Member
whilst i agree with a lot you have said , i do think a lot of birds need to be rescued from stubborn minded people who keep them in a small cage all day and miss treat or neglect these wonderful creatures , they are highly intelligent animals and being so bored that their only entertainment is to pluck out their own feathers for me screams out , i need to be rescued
I think its very easy to prejudge parrot owners. People acquire parrots with good intentions, but don't realise what is involved or how much attention a parrot requires. Sometimes there are great parrot owners out there, but their personal situation changes through no fault of their own, which means people have to made a difficult decision to re-home a parrot. There are some people that inherit a parrot due to the original owner passing away or becoming ill.

There are many reasons why parrots pluck out their feathers. One of our Zoo keeper friends that keep parrots at the zoo, provides the parrots with plenty of enrichment, but yet some of the parrots have started feather plucking for absolutely no reason. They even have a flock of rainbow birds in a large aviary with plenty of enrichment, but even a couple of these have started to feather pluck, one was due to its partner passing away.

Unfortunately, it's not possible to rescue every bird that needs rescuing.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
I have helped many owners look after there birds better without having to have the bird rehomed. the main problem is that the owners become scared of there birds that leads them to not allow there birds out. I try to help them gain confidence if I can but its not always possible, then I will advise them that they should find a home that can allow there bird the chance of freedom from its cage. Education and the acceptance of changing the birds environment, feeds and treats I have not had much problem with except with the case of Lucky then I had to give the person an ultimatum of allowing me to buy him or I will involve the RSPCA and show them the evidence I had gathered. I gave him a few chances of showing improvement in the conditions and feed but each time I visited thing got to a more concerning state although he new I was visiting on that day. well the last strew was the following week when I went Lucky had no fresh food, no seed mix (he did not have any in his home to give lucky) and his water bowl was as dry as a bone, and I will not state the state of the cage and the pile of poop that had accumulated. Lucky was Lucky I went there he got quite thin and was very sleepy, I just could not walk out without him as I doubt he would of lived the next couple of days, even when I got him home it was still touch and go I had my avian vet come around and she refused to take blood samples as he was so thin and week, it took two weeks of careful feeding for him to be fit enough to have a blood sample taken. He is now in full fitness and a member of my free birds that do not have cages but is what I term as a rescue bird. plucking can be through many reasons and mainly after a lose of what they class as a partner ok bad diet may not help nor boredom and lack of free time if the bird wants it, but plucking is not a killer so I class it as rehoming to better its life if possible.
 

JessCheekyMia

Regular Member
My Gizzie was a rescue. Now he was found with wrong food, cage hadn't been cleaned for years. They had a job getting into his cage as the filth and poop had stuck everywhere making it hard to open the main door. He was never let out of his cage for 4 years.
Bernie was a rescue before I got her. Jenny and Bob got asked to take her in asap. She was found with no seeds and water. What I have been told the guy wasn't a nice person too. So they took her in but unfortunately after 8 years of having her Bob got diagnosed with a lung condition. He tried everything to be able to still have her with them. But he was advised by his consultant that she needs to be removed from their house so I took her in. They still very much love her and me too.

I feel people need to stop judging others until you know the real situation. As it is not always as it seems.
 

Wakizashi21

Regular Member
I completely agree that every case is a different scenario. Every parrot i have rehomed, had a sad story with it and all previous owners loved them to bits. It may be an issue about education as if no one ever told them sunflower seeds are bad, they will continue to feed them. Parrot health and care needs to be done the same way as cats/dogs for it to have an impact


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darrendiver

Regular Member
i agree if a owner is prepared to listen to others , but that's easier said than done , a lot feel they know enough and won't entertain the possibility that they could be wrong ,
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
this is why I use my experience and my own flock to help change there minds, I think I am in a better position than most as my age earns respect from the older generation plus when they see how the birds I keep react to me and even there birds react and take food that they are not used too in some cases. I cannot say I can get close to every bird I see as I am always looking at there body language but I do get close to most as I use my experience in handling many species but its enough to get there owners to be better owners and there bird to be better cared for.
 
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