Hot temperatures

Sauropod8

Regular Member
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Morning,

Isn't it warm right now?! 34 degrees round here in the day, and still 20 degrees at night.

We have our conure out of his cage pretty much all the time when we are home, so can't open windows and doors. Our fan in the living room tells us the indoor temperature is a constant 29 degrees.

Just wondering if parrots cope okay in temperatures like these? I know they come from tropical climates so presumably can cope.

Our conure always has access to fresh water and his washing bowl. When i got him out of his cage this morning I noticed his feet were particularly warm.

How is everybody else doing in this heatwave?
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Hi again, that's a great question well I like to point out the old saying that only mad dogs and Englishmen stay out in the mid day sun, in the wild birds get there feed early and then late in the day as these are the coolest times. birds do cope well if they are shaded and have good access to water but also not every parrot comes from warm places as some can live in high altitudes. having a good circulation in your home may help to keep the temperature down but then having full sun on them or being placed near or in a conservatory can cause death, being out in the garden with out shade can also cause the death of a bird in the very hot weathers. as far as my self, I cannot stand this heat myself
 

JackAndRob

Moderator
Staff member
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I have an Oregon Scientific device that has wireless sensors placed at the front and back of the house. This helps to see where the cooler air can be drawn from. If it is cooler outside and it is possible to open doors and windows safely, I do so. Ventilation helps too, but as soon as it becomes warmer outside, I shut doors and windows, and draw curtains/blinds. The sun moves around to the back of the house through the day, so the porch becomes cooler. At that point, I leave the internal doors to the front open, leaving the external doors closed. The ground floor is always significantly cooler than upstairs.

Our birds normally have a nap from about midday to 3-4pm. At the very least I leave them undisturbed and don't encourage them to play too much. Spray showers and ceramic bowls of water in their cages if they want a paddle/bath - the budgies really like that..
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Just because it is hot out side or in your home you should never spray your bird with chilled water as this can cause your bird shock, its far better to spray with water that is near to room temperature, you can provide ice lollies to cool down the water but not all parrots like cold stuff in there water, fruits and greens are normally accepted when it comes straight from the fridge, things like grape are one of my flocks favourite treats along with fresh corn on the cob chilled.
 

Scott199

Regular Member
its a battle, the one thing to think about is, even though they may come from a hot climate, they have acclimatised to our temperature.

ie if i put Bert out in anything above 22/24 degrees even with shade he will start to pant after a few minutes, now we do keep our house quite cool, even in the winter it will only be around 16/18 degrees, so i assume he's acclimatised to that and the hot temp effects him more, this is only a guess.

i bought one of these for him a few days ago, seems to work quite well just to keep the temp down for him, i have it pointed at a middle perch, so he can go up top to avoid it or come down if he's hot.

but also it basically evaporates water into a filter, so you can freeze the filter to get it colder, but im also thinking (not tried yet) you could remove the filter and it would spray a fine mist of water.

 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
I have tried coolers that use water to humidify and suppose to help chill the air they push out but found them no good and only have slight affect at first when the water you put in is chilled. Ok I have not used that model but the ones I had used was floor standing. if you want to always get cool air you need one with a fridge system in it
 

Sauropod8

Regular Member
Registered
Thanks everybody for your replies :)

I made a fruity smoothie and froze it into ice cubes the other day, and Pico loves to have one in a little bowl and he eats it as it melts.

We have a small fan in his cage room, but dont have it pointed at his cage its just there to circulate the air. Might look in to one of those coolers that use water.

Any thoughts on his warm feet? Is that just part of how they thermoregulate or does it signify that he is too warm?
 

Scott199

Regular Member
I have tried coolers that use water to humidify and suppose to help chill the air they push out but found them no good and only have slight affect at first when the water you put in is chilled. Ok I have not used that model but the ones I had used was floor standing. if you want to always get cool air you need one with a fridge system in it
i was skeptical so tried it first and next to a normal fan to see the difference, certainly not an air conditioner but this little one did cool the air slightly for a good few hours, although i did use water from the fridge, so it was cold to start with.
 
We have windows through the house locked to the open position (smaller gap a macaw couldn't fit through) and all interior doors open. Our birds never investigate open windows or doors, but we wouldn't want to push our luck! We also have a humidifier in their room, the back door wide open (the aviary is attached to the house, but they never go out on their own anyway, they prefer to be chauffeured). Then lastly, another fan near the doorway for air circulation.

Hot feet I think may be a way to keep cool? If you think about it, their bodies are covered in a big feathery blanket, with their feet sticking out the end. It's the only bit (apart from bare faces like macaws and some too's) that is exposed to air. I'm sure if I'm mistaken, someone more knowledgeable will kindly correct me!
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Can't correct somebody who's spot on @MJGB - MikeJenGaryBeckyBoo :)
My lot had a right good soaking first thing this morning looked like a whole set of drowned rats that had then been pulled through a hedge backwards :risas3:
Totally awesome smell of soggy birdies though
I had the windows and doors open first thing to drag in a bit of cooler air but now it's stinking hot outside keep spraying the aviary gang down so they don't overheat.
You can tell when a bird is overheating since the don't have sweat glands to cool down they have their mouths open panting air through their system (as well as the hot feet referred to earlier)
 

Wendy Cooper-Wolfe

Regular Member
Like others we open windows when is cool and shut them as soon as the temperature rises, like wise with shutters. When it's not too hot we can go out under the shade, but if does starts looking like she's panting she goes straight indoors. However l think she has adapted to being here as she copes well until it gets to about 34 degrees.
Unfortunately I think she was terrorised by a spray bottle when she was in the pet shop as she wont tolerate being sprayed at all. I've tried her with a splashy tap, offered her a shower but all she does is bath in her water bowl when she sees fit.
 

RoyJess

Regular Member
We have windows through the house locked to the open position (smaller gap a macaw couldn't fit through) and all interior doors open. Our birds never investigate open windows or doors, but we wouldn't want to push our luck!
I've fitted some window restrictor's to our windows, see link below. I fitted them in a way that our window will not open enough to allow our birds out. Bare in mind that most animals including birds will look bigger than the actual gap that they can really fit through, so make sure you fit them so the window gap is smaller than you really think they should be, they will not only stop your birds from escaping, but will also stop thief's from getting in.

This is the type that I went for, but I'm sure that I manage to find a seller on eBay that did a job lot making the unit price cheaper.

 
I've fitted some window restrictor's to our windows, see link below. I fitted them in a way that our window will not open enough to allow our birds out. Bare in mind that most animals including birds will look bigger than the actual gap that they can really fit through, so make sure you fit them so the window gap is smaller than you really think they should be, they will not only stop your birds from escaping, but will also stop thief's from getting in.

This is the type that I went for, but I'm sure that I manage to find a seller on eBay that did a job lot making the unit price cheaper.

Thanks! They would certainly allow for a bigger gap, whilst still keeping them safe!
 
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