Hi From Staffordshire

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
should of read what I typed Parrot797 I meant to type must not be, the easy way to tell the difference is by looking at the beak the blue fronted has a black beak and the orange winged has a coral beak with black.
 

Rich Osborn

Regular Member
If a dna could tell me apx hatch dates too I'd look into gettin one sorted but I have no intent to breed so can't justify costs just for sexing

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Rich Osborn

Regular Member
Can't find it via app so will get on pc later, I don't suppose there is a site/s I can search his ring number was ever recorded anywhere?

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dianaT

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
If the ring had PS on it then the Parrot Society may be able to help but otherwise I doubt it can be researched.
Folk often ask about tracing their parrots ring but often breeders prefer to remain anonymous sometimes that is for security reasons if they breed a fair amount of birds and that is understandable.
I have to say in my opinion if it has 18 on the ring the likely it was hatched then and he does not look that old.
 

CaptainHowdy

Regular Member
DNA shouldn't cost a lot. Its used to be £17 per bird through animal genetics .uk (avian biotech). You just need to pluck some feathers - moulted will not work, or get your vet to give you a blood sample from the little one.
 

Rich Osborn

Regular Member
Oh first Google gave me 95 so quickly closed tab with a swift nope lol
I'd probably have to get him to a good avian vet try limiting the stress/bad being associated to me, he does need re-clipping and be good to get general health, nails n beak poss trimmed if needed

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Rich Osborn

Regular Member
He came clipped and whilst training it is easier once can handle him fully step up etc I'll do same as last two and let feathers come fully back

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CaptainHowdy

Regular Member
He came clipped and whilst training it is easier once can handle him fully step up etc I'll do same as last two and let feathers come fully back

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Clipping a bird doesn't make them tame it just forces them to rely on you. I have see plenty of times where a clipped bird is allowed to grow his feathers out only to become 'wild' because a bond hasn't been formed.

Clipping can also cause serious psychological and physical problems for the bird which can be life long issues. I have seen birds mutilate themselves because the clipped wing feathers irritated them that much where it sat. I have also had birds myself that never learnt to fly properly as they had always been clipped before they came to me and they missed out on vital time to learn how to fly and to build up and keep their muscles in top condition. They were actually more of a danger to themselves because of the clipping.

Plus flying is the best cardiovascular exercise they can get.


I would seriously reconsider the clipping.
 

Wendy Cooper-Wolfe

Regular Member
When we first had Dora (5 yrs today) we introduced her to the vet for a once over. She was clipped at the time and he said that vets would like it to be illegal to clip wings. Safety in getting away from trouble and the cardiovascular exercise that flying gives being 2 of the reasons, also allows the bird to move naturally and helps prevent arthritis. Add to that the independence for her and pleasure it gives both her and us when she flies to us, or back to her own chosen space.
So IMO let them grow as soon as possible.
 
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