Hi from a new soon to be owner

Roz

Regular Member
With a rescue you can see the final character of the bird. I had never thought about rescues/rehomes before I got Kobe the Pionus. Now I have three rescue and rehome Amazons. The Amazons are much easier than Kobe who I had from a baby. Getting a baby doesn't promise a smooth journey.
 

Scott199

Regular Member
I’m also looking at a Quaker, seem to be roughly the same size as a conure ?
They seem to have the kind of temperament I’m looking for, friendly, outgoing and also a bonus of possibility of talking. (Heard they are loud but I guess all parrots can be)

Any good/bad comments on these ?

seems like Ive put myself on a never ending road, I honestly believe one will just “click” and when it does I’d like to have a little knowledge to make that final decision, I’ve “clicked” with two now but came home, researched, asked, read and watched and they were gone by the time I’d found out more info.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
I love the Quaker but they do not normally get on with other species and can even attack and been known to kill other species of birds. they can become cage and even area protective. if you want a Quaker then its best to only keep them with other Quakers.
 

Scott199

Regular Member
I love the Quaker but they do not normally get on with other species and can even attack and been known to kill other species of birds. they can become cage and even area protective. if you want a Quaker then its best to only keep them with other Quakers.
Thank you sir, I only intend to have one bird, maybe another in time, who knows but at this point I’m not looking to have more.
I have read a lot about the cage thing, and I think it’s understandable and workable, as it’s constant it’s something you can adjust to, this is all speculation of coarse as I have zero first hand knowledge.

other than those things, anything else ?
 

Roz

Regular Member
Quakers are bigger than the tiny Green Cheek Conures. Quakers are 90 - 120gms whilst GCC are around 70 - 90gms. My US friend adores her Quakers - they are perfect for her. If she had her parrot life over, she would stick with Quakers only. She has a large flock of different parrots. She finds her Quakers loving, outgoing, sometimes fiesty, I believe they speak English (she has said in the past Quakers can be good talkers). Unfortunately her male picked a fight with one of her Amazons and had his top beak ripped off recently. She now has her Quakers in a room separate from the rest of her bigger flock. Some tend to build their HUGE nests (out of sticks or similar) which can be a problem.

Remember that every parrot is an individual, not only with inborn traits, but shaped by life experiences right from hatching. It is easier than you think to inadvertently reinforce unwanted behaviour.... and likewise it is easy to reinforce behaviours you want to see more of.
 

Scott199

Regular Member
Hi @Roz thank you, I understand they are builders, is that bad then ?

I read quite a lot that say they are happy and content to spend hours quietly building and giving them material is a way to keep them occupied and content if your not at home.

Do you or your friend think that’s a bad idea ?
 

Roz

Regular Member
Hi Scott, the trouble with allowing a parrot to build a nest is that they can become territorial/protective about the nest site, which is natural. I say 'can become' because it is not a problem with some birds, yet with others, it can make life very difficult when they try to drive you away with aggressive behaviour. It can also keep hormones running high, because they are in constant nesting mode, which is hard on the body. As I said, with some parrots there is no problem with having a nest site - you can monitor the behaviour.

Because Quakers build such huge nests, if it happens to be inside the cage, it is going to make cage cleaning impossible... which could become a health hazzard. I don't think my friend's Quakers have ever built nests - I will indeed ask her opinion.

Here is a video of Sparky building is home which @DizzyBlue posted a while back here:

 

Roz

Regular Member
My friend gave me a short reply - she might expand later but here it is:

With just 2 Quakers, I’m FAR from an expert. I’ve been so busy since they arrived as I was retiring, so I’ve done less research than I did on my earlier bebes. But my guess is that it’s the female who’s more likely to get aggressive. Sage seems to love weaving his chains w/o any more aggression happening. Tunia gets feisty. Bit me just an hr ago in fact. Newspapers get her overly excited. I would give both more weaving material if I thought they’d use it, but neither seems as interested as some Quakers.

Plus I found a brief description of her male Quaker, Sage. It's a paragraph out of his story:

I’ve lived with about 200 parrots of about 15 genera since 1994, but this was my first Quaker experience. I don’t tell the flock, but if a Quaker had been my first, I might have gotten no others. He's adorable -- interactive, funny, and pure pleasure even when chewing holes in my collars. He's such a lover boy that I would love to grow old with him asking “How are you?”, telling me he loves me, and insisting he’s my “perfect sweetheart.”. His reactions often reveal that he is very aware of what I’m doing and what I want him to do, often without any vocal hints from me. I can easily imagine his saying the same of me … “Sometimes I’m sure she understands just what I want her to do. And she does it!”
 

Scott199

Regular Member
I found a place that had a few quakers today, couldn’t hold any but they seem so sweet and innocent they had blue and green but that little sweetie look had a devilish undercurrent I think :p

but it was nice to see them and GCC’s in the same place, they seem the perfect size for us, I had no fear of the beak like I had with Amazon’s.

I was warned how noisy they are, so stayed to listened and thought “it’s not that bad” and the guy said that’s at about 40%, not sure if I could handle 100% for more than a minute or two, but going back to spend a few more time with them.
 
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Scott199

Regular Member
Just an update.

Things still ongoing, still researching, chatting and the like, i have been in contact with a couple of parrot rescues and thinking of being a safe-house.

Now ive been told any bird would be matched or try to be based on my home/family etc and id get full support and back-up with advise help etc, with no obligation to take anybird.

In your experience is this true ? do you actually get back up or is it "here you go, good luck, call us and well do a little to help" type thing ?


i know it seems a strange route, but i feel it would give me knowledge and the like of different breeds, less chance of me getting the wrong bird and having to rehome it, support and back-up, but most importantly, id be helping a little bird have a better life for a short while (well i hope i would).

i've had long conversation and be completely truthful with both rescues as to what i know and time i can spend and they both seem happy, i have home checks this week and next (i'll still go through these regardless of being a safe house, as i will potentially adopt anyway)
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Be your self, Ask questions on what they expect from you and your home, they are there not only to check on you and your home but to make sure every thing is safe for there birds whilst in there care. they should check what you cook with, the rooms the birds will live or go into, they will look for things like mould or dampness, they should also tell you what things can be dangerous for birds. some things you may not even realise. they may even advise on changes. its no good trying to make your place look better than normal just because they are coming and most of all do not use any form of spray or candle or chemical to try to make your place smell nice.
 

Scott199

Regular Member
@Michael Reynolds

thank you, I am fighting this with the wife, normal reaction to a stranger is make the house immaculate, I’m saying no, leave it as normal and they will advise, so hopefully everything will be as normal.

I want as much advise as possible, as much info as they offer.

I’m not going to lie I’m a little nervous they will say “sorry not safe here” not just as a rescue but if they say that, then I’ll not get one full stop.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Do not worry, if they are not happy they will advice you on any changes you will need to do. there interest should only be for there birds they are wishing to be looked after. your role is to care for there birds, its not always easy and you will be responsible for a bird that is not yours. Knowing that one day they can move the bird on is also hard especially if you have formed a bond and get close. they should provide a history of the birds character likes and dislikes, sex and age and if any medication or special diet is needed for each bird they decide to home with you. Do not believe in some of the soft stories of come from a bad home, most birds get given to the charities come from loving homes that for one reason or another the circumstances have changed. people who do not care for there birds hardly ever seek rehoming through charities apart from some cases that the RSPCA get involved with. the biggest problem can be with a parrot that loved its old owner and misses them and the bond they had. they may resent you and blame you for not being there last owner,
 
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