Help please

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Ringnecks can breed at anytime and the feral have been known to have four sets of chicks in a year although normally two sets I have known three sets while in captivity apart from the winter itself when there is not a lot of food around but chicks seam to have a better rate of survival when it is not too hot or too cold, first batch are normally in earl march the latest beginning of October, june and july are not great months august and September there is more fruits around and good breeding
 

Pwills

Regular Member
Registered
Can’t believe after all this I’m going to have to wait til next year lol
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
No but it can help to identify a bird, mine are all chipped. the ring is what the breeder will use to identify his birds, this can also be a reference that the owner can use to prove the bird is there's, Micro Chipping is a more secure way of telling a bird is yours, micro chips need to be read by a machine and are not visible. ringing can also be used in identification of the sex of your bird or the year of birth
 

JessCheekyMia

Regular Member
@Parrot797 I disagree. That is reckless advice in my opinion. Have you seen the thread showing the injuries inflicted on some of the forum members? Would you tell a child, having received an injury like that, that you hope that they have learned their lesson? Not impressed at all.
I agree with you. Also the bird will get the blame and then rehomed like a lot of parrots do for being aggressive. So the parrot ends up suffering in the end.
 

JessCheekyMia

Regular Member
I love cockatiels, I have 3 and I am so in love with them all. They all give out affection mainly towards me but they are happy to go to other family members for a head scratch.
Hahns macaws again are a brilliant little parrot but I struggled to find one until lovely @dianaT got me a rehomed. I love her, she is bonded with my hubby but I can stroke her and hold her. She also loves my Mum.
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Sorry I have never dealt with them so I cannot comment but I did get a little concerned with one of the comments they chose to publish. Some one had bought a couple of macaws but the way I read it is the new keeper was sitting in the garden watching them drinking a glass of wine, now I cannot recommend giving wine to any parrots :pet-parrot::copas::risas3:
 

Pwills

Regular Member
Registered
Hi all. Sorry to bother you again. I’ve found some ringnecks on pets for home but the haven’t been hand reared what’s your thought on that. Would it be easy to do it. ?? Thanks
 

CaptainHowdy

Regular Member
Hi all. Sorry to bother you again. I’ve found some ringnecks on pets for home but the haven’t been hand reared what’s your thought on that. Would it be easy to do it. ?? Thanks
Are they selling them for you to handrear them or do you mean bonding with a parent reared bird?

If they are wanting you to handrear then run away from that breeder!

If you mean bonding with a parent reared bird then its perfectly possible with time and patience :)
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
This is the thread that Jack&Rob is referring to its an old thread hence my first post has the photo missing but if you scroll through page by page you will see the bites that we have had and we're adults!
People all too readily give the nice side of owning a parrot but don't show the other side ......
The loudest parrot scream is done by the moluccan cockatoo hitting the same decibel range as a harrier jump jet at take off .... difference is the jet will either take off or run out of fuel but the Too can keep going and going and going ..... hearing damage to humans is possible. Other birds can be just as loud and ear piercing and relentless. People have a strange thought that its easier to have a parrot than it is a dog or a at or indeed a guinea pig ..... that's totally false its harder to keep a bird than it is other pets hence we see so many birds dying and being injured, birds are not domesticated they are permanently one generation from wild status. Just because we want one doesn't always mean that the time is right to have one.
Children are a handful at the best of times leaving doors open or slamming them without checking out if the bird is on top of the door and injuring birds its not that children are bad its just that children do not have adult experience at seeing a dangerous situation and reacting accordingly.
Your baby you say is 6 months old and when your happy your little one is napping through the day are you going to have a bird screaming and waking the child? And just because you select a bird doesn't mean the bird is going to get along with children some birds really dislike children as in deed some don't like men or women etc the old fable of a male bird like female humans and visa versa actually is just a fable birds are as individual as humans.
Would respectfully suggest you think long and hard about deciding to get a bird you also have to think about if its right for a bird and your responsibilities to them rather than get one and realise actually this is ruddy hard work and nothing like I dreamed about and then selling the bird on for the merry go round of rehoming.
It's not that I want to put you off but I do want you to see the bigger picture budgies can get to 20 years old, cockatiels to 25, greys to 40-50 years and the larger macaws like Poncho who starred in 102 dalmatians is a bird that was brought from America for the film and retired here in England and (is fully documented due to import paperwork) in 2018 last time I checked she was 92 years old and still going strong.

"Edited as I got the wrong name of the person referring to the bite thread ...... just write it off to my old age!!"
 
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JackAndRob

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
It was me that mentioned the injuries thread, but thanks for going to the trouble of finding the link, DizzyBlue

With a parrot's intelligence comes a whole load of good and bad personality traits. They are often said to be bipolar - they can be super sweet one moment then fly into a rage the next. They are problem solvers and planners too. It is really cool to watch them perform a series of steps to get at a treat, but they can use the same skills to plan an attack when we are most vulnerable. They also have LONG memories.

There is much that we can do to encourage and reinforce the positive behaviour of our birds, but under the fluffy, feathery exterior a monster always lurks :D
 
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