Getting a larger bird..

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
Hi everyone, hope you're all well.

I am looking for some advice on getting a larger species of parrot. At present I have 2 parrotlets. I've owned both an Indian Ringneck and a cockatiel in the past. I would like to add a larger parrot to my flock at some point in the future when I feel as though my existing birds are completely settled and I am in a position where I have the time and finances to take on a larger bird. I am 22 years old and I live in a flat on my own which of course may be an issues because of the noise capabilities of larger birds. I own the flat so am allowed to own pets but I'm not sure how keen my neighbours would be on the noise. My neighbour has a dog that barks all the time and I play piano and have my music blaring at all hours of the day and had no complaints over the past 2 years.

I am just wondering if getting a larger bird would be a possibility and if so does anyone have any recommendations of breed. I have been looking at Eclectus parrots as I read they are quite docile in terms of vocalisation but also know that these things can really just depend on the individual. I wouldn't be taking on a larger bird until I am 100% happy that I have the time to commit to it. Also I have looked into possibly adopting but slightly worried about adopting a bird because I know that it might be more challenging than a hand reared baby.

Any advice greatly appreciated :D
 

Yellowchickenparrot

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Weirdly a dog barking is a lot more acceptable than a parrot screaming it’s head off a few times a day, I would go the same for music and piano playing is more background noise. I would not be to put off by adopting especially if you can meet the bird before hand maybe a few times. It also depends on how honest the charity is about the birds habitats behaviour and past. I have a fantastic rescue bird and would say it’s worth looking into.
 
Last edited:

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
Weirdly a dog barking is a lot more acceptable than a parrot screaming it’s head off a few times a day, I would go the same for music and piano playing is more background noise. I would not be to put off by adopting especially if you can meet the bird before hand maybe a few times. It also depends on how honest the charity is about the birds habitats behaviour and past. I have a fantastic rescue bird and would say it’s worth look into.
Yeah I get that parrot screaming isn't everyone's favourite sound :lol: My Indian Ringneck used to scream quite a lot but I still lived with my parents then in the middle of nowhere so I had no neighbours. My neighbours are quite laid back and pleasant enough so perhaps I could just run it past them. I am quite keen on adopting as I would like to give a parrot a better home and I know a lot of people take them on without doing their research. I just know from my parrotlets coming to me at 2 years old from another home where they weren't cared for properly that it has been more challenging to gain their trust. I didn't spend any time with them though prior to taking them on. I just met the guy in a carpark and saw the state of them and felt really bad for them so took them in... probably not the best way to go about purchasing a pet:rolleyes: but no regrets because they have a better home and I wouldn't be without them. Definitely think going to a rescue and visiting a few times before deciding though would be a better way to go about it so I will definitely consider it :D
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
From personal experience ...

Our Eclectus can be very noisy when the mood takes him, especially when he gets excited knowing that my wife will soon be home from work (I swear that he watches the clock!).

Our Jardine is vocal but even at her loudest it is bearable and brief. She growls (softly) a lot, which is supposed to be a sign of irritation, but she also does it when she is playing. I think Greys do this too, so it must be an African parrot thing. It is very cute, whatever it is for.

Quakers can split eardrums (but our Ekkie still has them beaten in the dB department).

Even our four budgies can easily out-shout the TV when they all chatter together - I have to turn the sub-titles on. A lot.

Never kept Conures, but I know they can be loud.
 

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
From personal experience ...

Our Eclectus can be very noisy when the mood takes him, especially when he gets excited knowing that my wife will soon be home from work (I swear that he watches the clock!).

Our Jardine is vocal but even at her loudest it is bearable and brief. She growls (softly) a lot, which is supposed to be a sign of irritation, but she also does it when she is playing. I think Greys do this too, so it must be an African parrot thing. It is very cute, whatever it is for.

Quakers can split eardrums (but our Ekkie still has them beaten in the dB department).

Even our four budgies can easily out-shout the TV when they all chatter together - I have to turn the sub-titles on. A lot.

Never kept Conures, but I know they can be loud.
I think it really does just depend on the individual. I really wanted a cockatoo when I was younger but I've heard they're pretty up there in terms of screaming although the ones I have met in person weren't too bad. Parrotlets aren't supposed to be very noisy but my pair call to each other back and fourth quite a lot and it gets pretty loud. I've heard Quakers in the wild in spain and know what you mean. I'm considering an eclectus, Grey or maybe a smaller species of Macaw. I'd love a large macaw but I'm not sure how well they'd fit into my current lifestyle but hopefully some day :see_hearts: I guess the bonus of adopting would be that I'd be able to spend some time with them beforehand to see just how vocal different species are. I've also not come across any Eclectus breeders in Scotland and rarely see them for sale.
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
It is often the types of sounds as much as the volume. Our Jardine Jessie mimics the landline ring tone really well and Eclectus Frankie has picked it up too. It isn't loud, but when you wonder whether it is really the phone or just one the birds, it can get quite irritating :rolleyes:

I change the ring tones on my personal and work mobile phones quite regularly, just to stop them repeating those!
 

Oli Fry

Regular Member
Registered
Just to add my twopence worth, I'd say that a hand reared-bird would probably be riskier than a rescue whose characteristics you could learn about in advance. Of my three greys, one is nearly silent most of the time, one is bearably noisy and the third sounds like a large spaceship and vocalises almost constantly!

Parent-reared or older birds (there are so many in need of good care)would be my only options if I were adding any more. Take your time any you'll find the right fit for you, and hopefully bring some happiness into the world along the way.
 

RoyJess

Regular Member
Parrots are generally noisy, the larger the bird, the higher the decibels that they can produce, some can equal decibels of a Jet engine taking off. If your parrot bonds with you, then it will call out for you when you leave the room, and they won't stop until you return, this can be a problem for your neighbours, especially when you go out for the day or go to work. Living in an attached home or a flat may be an issue for your neighbours. Our budgies and Cockatiels can produce some noise, Our amazons are even louder, but I think my Missy as small as she is has got to be the most persistent when it comes to vocalisation, I now own a pair of ear defenders
 

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
Just to add my twopence worth, I'd say that a hand reared-bird would probably be riskier than a rescue whose characteristics you could learn about in advance. Of my three greys, one is nearly silent most of the time, one is bearably noisy and the third sounds like a large spaceship and vocalises almost constantly!

Parent-reared or older birds (there are so many in need of good care)would be my only options if I were adding any more. Take your time any you'll find the right fit for you, and hopefully bring some happiness into the world along the way.
I think when lockdown is over I shall look into adopting rather than getting a baby just because I know theres quite a few birds that end up in rescues and it will give me the opportunity to spend time with the bird before taking it home
 

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
Parrots are generally noisy, the larger the bird, the higher the decibels that they can produce, some can equal decibels of a Jet engine taking off. If your parrot bonds with you, then it will call out for you when you leave the room, and they won't stop until you return, this can be a problem for your neighbours, especially when you go out for the day or go to work. Living in an attached home or a flat may be an issue for your neighbours. Our budgies and Cockatiels can produce some noise, Our amazons are even louder, but I think my Missy as small as she is has got to be the most persistent when it comes to vocalisation, I now own a pair of ear defenders
When I owned an Indian Ringneck it would call out quite often and was incredibly loud at times. I would leave her to go to school and she would be very vocal when I got back but as her vocabulary increased she would usually replace the screams will words and ask me what I was doing as soon as I got in the door. Parrotlets aren't supposed to be that noisy but sometimes I think my pair haven't quite got the memo on that one. They go from being completely silent to calling out to each other. They used to live in the same cage and weren't noisy at all but now that they are separated they call out back and fourth. The noise doesn't bother me but I am concerned about how my neighbours will react to it. Maybe I should just buy them ear defenders :lol:
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
We got our Eclectus from a private seller. He appeared to be very much neglected and he was in pretty poor shape. He was quiet and timid at first (to be expected, uprooted from one home into another), but we spend loads of time with him (and continue to do so) and he gradually came out of his shell. His overall health, manner and appearance has changed so much that you'd think he was a different bird. Almost a year after he joined us, he is a very much loved part of our family, as are all of our birds, but he is by far the noisiest and he can sustain a bout of racket making for far longer than the other birds, when he's in the mood to do so. He doesn't cause us any problems with the noise and we happily accept him as he is.

Some of Frankie's screams have been replaced with noises that he has picked up from around the house and from the other birds. They are quieter than screams, but when he's in the mood for a good scream, he lets rip with all of the enthusiasm that he can muster..

A change of environment, even within the same home, could easily bring on different behaviour in any bird.
 

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
Parrots are noisy, nuts and very entertaining. I struggle with my mental health and being in lockdown hasn't helped with that as I am alone every day but my birds give me a reason to get myself up and keep to a routine so as not to mess up theirs. I couldn't be without them and cant wait to add a new addition to our little family. When I do though I will be sure to do plenty of research and only commit to it if I can provide a good home :) I am glad that your Eclectus is now well cared for. I have come across a few ads for older Eclectus parrots looking to be rehomed that appear to perhaps have a vitamin deficiency as they look quite scruffy and their feathers are very dark and dull. It is a shame to see as they're gorgeous birds .

How did your other birds react to the new addition? That is also a concern of mine. Worried that my parrotlets will not react well to another bird in the house as they are quite timid and a pretty territorial species
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
We had the four budgies at the time that Eclectus Frankie arrived. They pretty much ignore everything except each other for most of the day. They do love supper time though. We hand feed them a finely chopped mix of beans, pulses, fruit, veg, brown rice and oat bran and they are all over us at that time. I love out bigger birds, but when our budgies are bouncing all over us they are so cute and dainty.

We feed a similar diet to all of our birds. It is made up of a number of different food groups - we just vary the amount of each group that we give to them. Frankie gets an AS30 parrot mix (no peanut, no sunflower), a low fat pellet, then lots of veg and a small amount of fruit. He's pretty good at eating from all of them - he doesn't seem to favour one more than another and he really enjoys the variety. This was one of the main problems he had with his previous keepers. His diet was poor, but now he's spoiled for choice.

His beak was dull as well as his feathers but they really shine now and the colours are more intense, especially after a shower, which he loves.


20200122_175249.jpg
 

Tonifrax

Regular Member
Registered
We had the four budgies at the time that Eclectus Frankie arrived. They pretty much ignore everything except each other for most of the day. They do love supper time though. We hand feed them a finely chopped mix of beans, pulses, fruit, veg, brown rice and oat bran and they are all over us at that time. I love out bigger birds, but when our budgies are bouncing all over us they are so cute and dainty.

We feed a similar diet to all of our birds. It is made up of a number of different food groups - we just vary the amount of each group that we give to them. Frankie gets an AS30 parrot mix (no peanut, no sunflower), a low fat pellet, then lots of veg and a small amount of fruit. He's pretty good at eating from all of them - he doesn't seem to favour one more than another and he really enjoys the variety. This was one of the main problems he had with his previous keepers. His diet was poor, but now he's spoiled for choice.

His beak was dull as well as his feathers but they really shine now and the colours are more intense, especially after a shower, which he loves.


View attachment 29862
Wow he is stunning! My birds had never had fruit of vegetables before I got them and were quite picky at first. I feed them a mix of beans, pulses, veg and a little fruit as well. They also eat goldenfeast petite hookbill but it is quite hard to get in the uk especially recently and it is pretty expensive. It's hard to get a decent mix that isn't mostly sunflower seed which I end up picking out and using for treats. They lso have harrisons pellets although Iv heard mixed opinions on feeding pellets especially to mutations
 

JackAndRob

Regular Member
AS30 (It says Avian Specific on the side of the pack) is a good blend that does not contain peanuts and sunflower seeds. We get it from Scarletts Parrot Essentials, but I believe that it is available from other suppliers too. Scarletts is usually good on price though.

Sunflower seeds are okay for some birds, in moderation, e.g. those that need a higher fat content, but ekkies are definitely not one of those species - they need low fat, high fibre. It is often said that particular care needs to taken with the diet for ekkies, but it doesn't mean that it is difficult. We regularly make stir fry meals, so the fridge is always full of lots of different veggies and most of it is good for the birds too. When I make a stir fry, I just take a selection from the fridge. I do the same when preparing food for the birds, slightly changing what I use each day to add more variety.
 
Top Bottom