Food To Avoid

Scarf

Regular Member
Really?! I would feel like I was feeding Alfie a cousin lol  Seems like the vet might not have been crazy after all. Do you know if fish is any good for them?
Oddly enough my avian vet also told me to feed my Rosella chicken. I generally don't as it gives me the creeps but bizarrely if I am eating chicken she divebombs my plate and helps herself.
 

Scarf

Regular Member
We were also advised to give our Garp boiled egg with the shell blended into it prior to laying for Calcium. I was nervous about the shell though so just gave her plain old scrambled egg with a calcium supplement.
 
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Scarf

Regular Member
Two questions:

A breeder I know says absolutely NO banana - I don't give plain banana but I do give banana chips and also cooked banana (in banana bread or in banana pancakes). Any opinions on this?

Also regarding sunflower seeds - total no-no or okay as an occasional treat? I used to use them for behavioural training but the vet told me off :dntknw:
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Mine either love banana or will not touch it Peter my rosella loves it but he will eat any fruit and veg but his partner rosie will only eat apple carrot and lettuce.  peter eats it if it is fresh or over ripe but dose not touch the dried ones.  Sun flower seeds do not have much goodness but I do use them but keep well away from the black ones
 

dianaT

Moderator
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Chicken and the bones i.e. leg/wing are a good source of calcium and all mine love to chew them up.

Hard boiled eggs chopped up although they don't all like that. I take the shell off but I know some folk leave it on.

Fresh bananas - not all of mine like them anyway but hey all get a slice or tow now and then, and they do have the dried bananas.
 
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Julia

Regular Member
I would never ever, ever give Archie any kind of animal product, eggs, bones or meat. I am a vegetarian but that wouldn't stop me feeding meat if I thought it was necessary as I prepare raw meat (yuck) for my dog...bones, ofal and all. However as someone else said, giving bird products to a parrot seems to border on cannibalism!

There is so much equivalent nutrients in other foods that I think that if the bird has a thoroughly well rounded diet there is no need. I think fresh, sprouted and varied is vital and as little cooked as you can get away with.

I should add that being vegetarian has caused me to do quite a bit of research on nutritional info for myself, such as where do you get your B vits so I have just applied the same to Archie. Tahnini and sesame is high in calcium I believe so he gets that mixed in with his veg/quinoa mix.

Besides I really don't think I could take kisses from Archie after he had been snacking on a chicken bone!
 
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Stinkie

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Moderator
A bird eating poultry or eggs isn't even close to cannibalism! Just because they belong to the same animal class doesn't mean they are related. Humans eat mammals regularly and nobody calls that cannibalism. Let's have some perspective lol.
 

Julia

Regular Member
A bird eating poultry or eggs isn't even close to cannibalism! Just because they belong to the same animal class doesn't mean they are related. Humans eat mammals regularly and nobody calls that cannibalism. Let's have some perspective lol.
Sorry Essie, I meant that was how I felt about it, and that is just me it was not meant as a statement of fact! And I apply the same feeling to my own diet. If I can't kill it, I won't eat it.
 
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Hedgehog

Regular Member
Forgive me, I'm a newbie...


But wouldn't parrots eat insects in the wild if given the chance?


I was going to give mine mealworms as we always have them for feeding the birds outside.
 

dianaT

Moderator
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Moderator
Am not sure about that, but I daresay someone will be along later to advise.  But I don't give them.
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
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Admin
Hi Hedgehog

When I used to breed kakariki's i used to feed mine live mealworms never dried they used to go crazy every time the dish appeared. Mind you the little beggers used to raid the blackbirds dishes for maggots too ...pretty randomly gross...but whatever floats the boat as the used to say!

Never fed my blue crown conures mealworms but probably because they were house birds and not aviary breeders...didn't kind of fancy trying to get meal worms out the carpets! :bad:

Not kept either species now for a couple of years for breeding only the odd random one as a pet bird.

Somewhere on side in the diet section i did upload a full diet sheet / care for a conure ...it was pinned but seems to have run away somewhere will find it for you later and ping it across :) it might be of some help :good:
 

Lou

Regular Member
thankyou for that I love reading new material, interesting and no you are right parrot nutrition is a minefield which is one of the reasons I don't believe in feeding just one thing, pellets for example are meant to have everything in them but how do nutritionists know 100% they cant cause as you say its a minefield and not enough research has been done so variety is the key I guess and no each species has different dietry requirements
 
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Bradders

Parrot Power!
Staff member
Moderator
Funny this, I was thinking about salt today as I know Ruby's Harrison's have salt in them. I have read that not enough sodium in a birds diet can lead to issues such as weight loss and iodine deficiency and some skin conditions have been linked to it but like us it's excessive salt that is the problem. And in a parrot, I guess you could reach excessive fairly quickly. But apparently, the odd salty snack is not harmful! However, I'm happy for her to have salt in her Harrison's and there must be some in her occasional piece of toast but I'm not having more than that!


Now, just have to practice what I preach on myself!
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
There's a difference between salt and sodium one is a composition the other is a pure form. Salt is sodium plus chloride and obviously sodium is on its own

The clay cliffs are a type of montrylite clay which is a composition of minerals etc and the use of it is only surmised they say its for two things to get the minerals they are missing and to remove the excess "salt" from their bodies
 
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Bradders

Parrot Power!
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Thanks Tascha for the science bit! Think Harrison's has sea salt and another type of sodium. Table salt is a no no!
 

DizzyBlue

Administrator
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Admin
you want science??? try this bit of useless info lol

Table sant has anti-caking additives such as sodium silicoaluminate or magnesium carbonate added helps make it pour easier plus since its refined to get that way in the first place its chemically altered due to the temperature reached.

Salt isn;t good in any shape or form when added but natural occuring "salts" which is a terminology for a variety of things such as minerals that are naturally found inside a salt style compound can be good.

Those clay cliffs are usually passed off as being montmorillonite clay ...there are lots of different types of clays though due to their compounds and not all clays are the same... those clay cliffs you see parrots eating from like that famous macaw picture that is always shows think it was taken by the national geographic peeps....well macaws don't eat any old type of clay its is specific clay cliffs in specific areas and they take their youngsters there at specific times of day and pass the knowledge on of where to find it and how to eat it etc...
 
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