Dandruff

Yellowchickenparrot

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So as some of you may know I have a parrot in SH at the moment, hes unfortunately just passing through as he needed collecting asap and I was the nearest to him. However I want to do my best for him, hes been a terrible plucker and even nibbled his feet. Hes got bad dry skin is there anything I can try to help him? I assume his diet and plucking has caused most his skin problems
 

DizzyBlue

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What species is the bird just out of curiosity?
Do we get piccies of the feet to see the state and check if the leg scaling is raised and irritated … birds chew their feet for lots of reasons like bumble foot so have a look at the soles and see if there are any red marks of pressure sores or say a large blackish round almost like a spot area (full blown bumble foot) then again chewing feet could be wrong perches caused arthritis....
A good shower drenching if the bird will stand for it would be a good idea tomorrow morning with plenty of time to dry out and a warm room to do it in as the naked ones feel the chill quicker than others. Start with just pure tepid water to ensure that anything on the skin or feathers is washed off things such as accumulation of dust, grease say from access to cooking areas, smoke from a smoking household etc. If there is anything on the feathers and skin that will be irritating and collect bacteria as the bird will feel itself to be sticky.
After a few good baths over a week or two then the aloe added to the spray especially if there are any cracks in the skin etc then that may have to be done sooner but clean skin and feathers is essential first don't want to be gluing anything on there that shouldn't be Aloe can be a soothing barrier lotion but we want the barrier to be in place after anything else is gone if you follow my thought process …..
Start offering the birdie good grub straight away obviously getting offered the fruit and veggies asap and a pinch of nutrobal twice a week to start with to build up anything missing after that it will be up to whoever takes the bird on to continue the process and take the bird done to one pinch of nutrobal once the levels have come up to proper standards in around one to two months time … probably the latter. Hopefully an avian vet visit is booked for a thorough examination … disease testing would be obviously helpful … especially if the little one has got something you would need to know to ensure the safety of the birds you own....
 

Michael Reynolds

Regular Member
Consult the charity and get permission from them to have the bird checked by an avian vet. See if they are willing to pay the bill. do not do what I did and do every thing under my own expense. it is there bird and they have the responsibility to see that the bird is healthy in every way. you are the birds carer and you have the responsibility to see that the charity will act. the vet will need to be paid strait away then you make a claim for the financial expense, this includes the fuel cost. they will send a check out to you so you must allow time for them to pay plus time for the check to clear, the charity when I joined gave us permission to have the birds health checked but soon after they stopped the financial backing. there was no way I would have there birds with my own with out making sure the bird was healthy. I spent more than two thousand just on blood checks and medication on there birds and never claimed one expanse. I still have all there birds papers from the vets as I paid for them I was not going to pass it on.
 

DizzyBlue

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As birdie has already arrived think the thing to do first is try and make the birdie comfy and start it on its way to getting content and settled. Bathed and see what reaction that has with the picking itching nibbling scratting behaviour then and get a check up booked if the avian vet then thinks anything could be a miss then go for the disease testing if anything shows up then get yours double checked.

Likelihood is its diet, lifestyle and ability to be able to keep itself clean and tidy that are under lying issues after that you think of things like lack of interaction / entertainment but as the routine changes due to a different household and ability to relax and be entertained is changed due to change of circumstance that will alter itself naturally anyway after that lot the only thing left on the scale that could be glaringly obvious would be something like a very stressy birdie who is startled by absolutely everything and a tad nurotic due to a long term thing such as owners having had a cat that sat next to it having a go or something of that nature....
 

dianaT

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Yes of course it's a Patagonia Conure, such lovely birds. Remembers Anns but Chaz is a B&G cross with a Pat.
 

Yellowchickenparrot

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Thanks dizzy, Di, Michael hes had one spray shower and one drench shower so hes fairly clean, hes very un steady on his feet possibly a older bird, but then he use to just sit on a sofa cuddling a old lady for years and only had a rodent cage with flat surfaces its taken him two years to be able to stand on a perch. Hes not got any open wounds on him now but did over preen and nibble when his original old lady owner gave him up. Hes all healed up and not bothered himself while hes been here, other than his skin just looks dry. Hes been fed tinned sweetcorn and bread for years so I suspect diet has a lot to do with it. Hes in a room upstairs well away from my two but I'm not to worried as hes very bright and active. Thanks for your concern Michael I would not get myself into a situation where I'm out of pocket and I do have permission to get him seen by a vet if I feel he needs it.
 

Wakizashi21

Regular Member
My greys are really really dusty...and honestly i use some aloe vera gel once a month and it really helps calm it down. I am sure i have read somewhere that they need some oily nuts to get that skin moisturised again? Correct me if i am wrong.

I also take my birds into the shower to sit there and get some steam from the shower. Helps with the dryness


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Yellowchickenparrot

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Yes I did read about the nuts and am giving some good food now but it would be interesting to see if the nut thing is true.
 

DizzyBlue

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Doesn't quite work like that guys reference nuts making the skin more oily. You need omega-3 fatty acid supplementation
Would be more inclined to think that the preen glad may not be working correctly and would need checking at some point to ensure its not stopped working and isn't diseased but that can be done on a routine health check.
Greys are a very dusty bird anyway just like cockatoo's and tiels
Healthier diet with lots of variety should start to sort the skin out though defo bread out the window! All that salt intake YACK!
Glad bathing has been done will make little one feel heaps better if feathers are nice and clean
Try getting some nice wider than normal perches on the go for night time roosting Henni had a platform style one until her feet got a bit better. Her feet have arthritis in them so her grip ability is never going to be great she also has to have branches with the bark on (I use apple) as the texture and the nobbly bits enable her to hold on better she has really rubbish grip … then again she has got missing toe sections that had to be amputated.

Really oddly am going to link to the SCUD document from the Vet Times I posted on other threads as it does explain the skin and what to do for wounds and dryness etc just ignore the diagnostic for SCUD part of it.
 

DizzyBlue

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Highest forms that parrots can eat are flax seed, hemp seed, chia seed, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, dark green leafy veggies
all round diet change with lots of the above added
Plus humidity is a big thing in keeping down the dust as they originate species wise in more humid countries than we keep them in and then we also go and stick the central heating on in a winter to keep warm but forget to add some humidity to the mix as the central heating dries the air out.
 
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