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A Strange Tale ....

Discussion in 'Parrot Breeders' started by plumsmum, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. plumsmum

    plumsmum Regular Member Registered

    A few weeks ago there was a knock on the door and there stood a guy who had done some work in the house for us. Invited him in for a coffee and he asks me if I want a AG, just like that? He was called he but could of been a she and was named Owen and is 16 years old.

    He explained he and his wife were due to move to Portugal in a couple of weeks, house sold the lot. I said I couldn't take him on a permanent basis because Plum would not take kindly to it long term but I offered to board the bird until they could return for him after getting settled and we all started to look at how that could be achieved. Then we hit CITES and the new changes, very confusing, he said that each country he went through ie France, Spain and Portugal wanted loads of paperwork, specialist pet flyers would cost £900? Owen I don't think had ever gone to the Vet, been DNA'd etc or even seen another bird? There were two opposing agendas the man's to get rid and his wife's wish to keep!

    Literally the next thing/day he says that their dog's Vet has suggested the RSPCA and they were going to surrender him to them, he would stay there for one week for tests and then be put in a breeding program that they were not told were it was. I felt awful and worried for the bird and prayed he would be OK, settle to his new life without it causing him stress.

    If you are a breeder of African Greys and come across one called Owen originally from Leicestershire please drop a line and let me know how he is, I would be so grateful.

    Would a AG who had been in a home environment all his life adapt to this change?
     
  2. TomsMum

    TomsMum Administrator Staff Member Admin

    Well what a strange tale...and I really do worry about some of the things the RSPCA come out with!
    If the bird is going into a breeding situation then it would have to become registered under CITES.

    I think it would take a while for a companion bird to adopt to aviary/breeding programme life, as human contact would become minimal- if they ever did adapt :confundio1:

    I wonder if @marley or @Parrot797 or @lockey have heard of this happening?
     
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  3. plumsmum

    plumsmum Regular Member Registered

    In my heart I desperately wanted to take him, wasn't even given the chance to meet Owen in the end. Couldn't do it at my boy's expense, Plum comes first, even before hubby LOL. :emoji_slight_smile:
     
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  4. Parrot797

    Parrot797 Regular Member

    While Greys will adapt to a breeding situation I cannot ever see the RSPCA ever putting one into the breeding "aviaries"(they are often bred in tiny cages in a dark shed).
     
  5. plumsmum

    plumsmum Regular Member Registered

    Really oh no!

    If I had enough .... I would phone Leicester and see what I could find out. Frightened I suppose?
     
  6. dianaT

    dianaT Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Maybe someone on here could offer Owen a good home?
     
  7. plumsmum

    plumsmum Regular Member Registered

    Unfortunately he's gone to this supposed breeding set up, that they would not disclose it's location. The guy acted so quick, literally I was asked one day, and he was gone to the RSPCA the day after that. Good riddance is how I see it, the guy had no love for Owen. This has really played on my mind.
     
  8. dianaT

    dianaT Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Poor bird.
     
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  9. Michael Reynolds

    Michael Reynolds Regular Member

    Its a shame that you could not take him on if you are long term caring for the bird it will not need paperwork as it has not been gifted or sold or used commercially just need to be able to provide its owners details and they will contact them if they have any suspicion.
     
  10. TomsMum

    TomsMum Administrator Staff Member Admin

    The point I was making Michael was that the RSPCA or whoever is runnng the breeding programme will have to get an Article 10 for it.
     
  11. Michael Reynolds

    Michael Reynolds Regular Member

    @TomsMum Only if the bird is sold or its chicks. I was surprised that the RSPCA would have a breeding programme for parrots after Knowing just how many need to find new homes any way. I know they cannot charge directly for a cites I bird without the correct paperwork but they will still expect an amount to be donated indirectly before the adoption. This is a problem that can affect many charities as all need to secure there ownership of the bird continues and there costs of transport and medication and tests are covered. Now it is not hard to prove that the original bird was in captivity before the article 10 was required and the RSPCA would of got a letter of gift from its owners . yes it is bordering on sticky grounds and although I have asked DEFRA on how this situation stands there reply is to be safe its best to register the bird. the biggest problem is not that many parrots come up for rescue with a recorded history that can be proven to the actual bird.
     
  12. TomsMum

    TomsMum Administrator Staff Member Admin

  13. Michael Reynolds

    Michael Reynolds Regular Member

    I am not disputing the cites I rules now define trader. are the charities traders? they are not selling birds. its yet again a grey area but I have three female and two male greys not planning on breeding none are registered and two are not mine but if they breed and I can prove there parents via DNA are captive bread and they are not used to gain finance or sold then no registry to DEFRA is needed. the word trader is so important that defines the need for the paperwork to be in place.
     
  14. dianaT

    dianaT Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    I do think some of all this is a grey area still. perhaps as time goes by they will make it clearer regarding charities.
     
  15. Michael Reynolds

    Michael Reynolds Regular Member

    yes I agree a very grey area and as you know I had to understand each word in definition regarding the position of the charity I work with to make sure I am not breaking laws and the CITES I birds can be adopted legally. I have to be careful how we ask for donations regarding endangered species and there adoption. at the same time we need great homes and of course like all charities need to stay fanatically stable. this I know may cause problems if things are not put over correctly and can be easily misunderstood.